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Part 1: Business Today

Summary Agenda: Chamber

Business Today: Chamber

11.30am Prayers

Followed by

QUESTIONS

Oral Questions to the Chancellor of the Exchequer

1Felicity Buchan (Kensington)
What steps his Department is taking to encourage levelling up across the UK. (900050)

2Ben Bradley (Mansfield)
What steps his Department is taking to encourage levelling up across the UK. (900051)

3Giles Watling (Clacton)
What steps he is taking to encourage cryptocurrency companies to operate in the UK. (900052)

4Kevin Hollinrake (Thirsk and Malton)
What steps his Department is taking to tackle economic crime. (900053)

5John Penrose (Weston-super-Mare)
What assessment he has made of the effects of high marginal deduction rates on work incentives for people who are (a) key workers, (b) on below average incomes and (c) on above average incomes. (900054)

6Mr Philip Hollobone (Kettering)
What discussions he has had with Cabinet colleagues on the efficiency of local authorities in delivering the £150 council tax rebate under the Energy Bills Support Scheme. (900055)

7Dan Carden (Liverpool, Walton)
What recent steps he has taken to ensure fairness in the application of the tax system. (900056)

8Margaret Ferrier (Rutherglen and Hamilton West)
What recent steps he has taken to progress the Government’s Access to Cash strategy. (900057)

9Anna Firth (Southend West)
What fiscal steps he has taken to support investment in UK infrastructure. (900058)

10Jeff Smith (Manchester, Withington)
What recent steps he has taken to help reduce economic inequality. (900059)

11Matt Western (Warwick and Leamington)
What recent assessment he has made of the strength of the UK economy. (900060)

12Lee Anderson (Ashfield)
What recent assessment he has made of the effectiveness of the Plan for Jobs in supporting people into work. (900061)

13Philip Dunne (Ludlow)
What fiscal steps his Department is taking to support small and medium size enterprises. (900062)

14Kirsten Oswald (East Renfrewshire)
What recent assessment he has made of the effect of his fiscal policies on the cost of living. (900063)

15Afzal Khan (Manchester, Gorton)
What steps he is taking to tackle increases in the cost of living. (900064)

16Gill Furniss (Sheffield, Brightside and Hillsborough)
What fiscal steps he is taking to reduce poverty in the most deprived areas. (900065)

17Ruth Jones (Newport West)
What recent steps he has taken to help reduce economic inequality in Newport West constituency. (900066)

18Andrew Bridgen (North West Leicestershire)
What fiscal steps his Department is taking to encourage regional growth across the UK. (900067)

19Gerald Jones (Merthyr Tydfil and Rhymney)
What fiscal steps he is taking to help reduce the impact of the rise in the cost of living on households. (900068)

20Stephen Farry (North Down)
If he will make an assessment of the potential economic impact of a suspension of the UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement. (900069)

21Lucy Allan (Telford)
What fiscal steps he is taking to encourage economic growth. (900070)

22Gavin Newlands (Paisley and Renfrewshire North)
What recent assessment he has made of the effect of his fiscal policies on the cost of living. (900072)

23Alison McGovern (Wirral South)
What fiscal steps he is taking to reduce the impact on households of the rise in the cost of living. (900073)

24Julie Marson (Hertford and Stortford)
What steps his Department is taking to encourage levelling up across the UK. (900074)

At 12.15pm

Topical Questions to the Chancellor of the Exchequer

T1Rachael Maskell (York Central)
If he will make a statement on his departmental responsibilities. (900075)

T2Hannah Bardell (Livingston) (900076)

T3Mark Pawsey (Rugby) (900077)

T4Mr Virendra Sharma (Ealing, Southall) (900078)

T5Alan Brown (Kilmarnock and Loudoun) (900079)

T6Stephen Farry (North Down) (900080)

T7Steve McCabe (Birmingham, Selly Oak) (900081)

T8Sir Edward Leigh (Gainsborough) (900082)

T9Ms Nusrat Ghani (Wealden) (900083)

T10Helen Morgan (North Shropshire) (900084)

URGENT QUESTIONS AND STATEMENTS

12.30pm

Ministerial Statements, including on:

Northern Ireland Protocol (Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs)

PRESENTATION OF BILLS

No debate (Standing Order No. 57)

Northern Ireland Troubles (Legacy and Reconciliation) Bill

Secretary Brandon Lewis

Bill to address the legacy of the Northern Ireland Troubles and promote reconciliation by establishing an Independent Commission for Reconciliation and Information Recovery, limiting criminal investigations, legal proceedings, inquests and police complaints, extending the prisoner release scheme in the Northern Ireland (Sentences) Act 1998, and providing for experiences to be recorded and preserved and for events to be studied and memorialised.

BUSINESS OF THE DAY

1. QUEEN’S SPEECH (MOTION FOR AN ADDRESS): ADJOURNED DEBATE [16 MAY]

Until 7.00pm (Standing Order No. 9(3))

Proposed subject for debate: Tackling short-term and long-term cost of living increases

That an Humble Address be presented to Her Majesty, as follows:

Most Gracious Sovereign,

We, Your Majesty’s most dutiful and loyal subjects, the Commons of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland in Parliament assembled, beg leave to offer our humble thanks to Your Majesty for the Gracious Speech which was addressed to both Houses of Parliament.

Amendment (a)

Caroline Lucas

Wera Hobhouse

Mick Whitley

Lloyd Russell-Moyle

Beth Winter

Nadia Whittome

Kim JohnsonTommy SheppardMary Kelly FoyTony LloydDouglas ChapmanRichard BurgonZarah SultanaBen LakeJonathan Edwards

At end add ‘but respectfully regret that the Gracious Speech did not deliver the urgent transformative action required in response to the climate and nature emergencies, and if the UK is to do its fair share to limit global temperature rise to 1.5°C; note with alarm the UN warning that governments plan to produce over twice the amount of fossil fuels in 2030 than is consistent with the 1.5°C target; further note that one million plant and animal species face extinction and that access to nature is profoundly unequal and that only 8 per cent of land in England is open access; and therefore call on the Government to bring forward a Climate and Ecology Bill to provide an evidence-based statutory framework to meet international climate and nature responsibilities, to enact a Green New Deal to restructure and decarbonise the economy, restore nature and launch a building retrofit revolution, to end any new coal, oil, or gas licences and abolish the duty to Maximise Economic Recovery, to support the international Fossil Fuel Non-Proliferation Treaty and the principle of a just transition, and extend the Countryside and Rights of Way Act 2000 to include rivers, woods, more grassland and Green Belt.’

Amendment (d)

Ian Byrne

Beth Winter

Dan Carden

Ms Diane Abbott

Geraint Davies

Ian Lavery

Grahame MorrisZarah SultanaBell Ribeiro-AddyJohn McDonnellIan MearnsAndy McDonaldBarry GardinerClaudia WebbeRichard BurgonMick WhitleyMs Marie RimmerTony LloydApsana BegumRebecca Long BaileyKate HollernSir George HowarthYvonne FovargueYasmin QureshiPeter DowdSir Mark HendrickRosie DuffieldJeremy CorbynCaroline LucasLloyd Russell-MoyleMary Kelly FoyDavid LindenKate OsamorValerie VazTahir AliNeale HanveyMarsha De CordovaCharlotte NicholsMrs Emma Lewell-BuckJon TrickettBen LakeLiz Saville RobertsHywel WilliamsJonathan EdwardsMargaret GreenwoodNadia WhittomeKim Leadbeater

At end add ‘but respectfully regret that the Gracious Speech does not contain measures to properly address the crisis of food poverty and the rising cost of living; acknowledge the profound and devastating consequences of food poverty on the health, wellbeing and livelihoods of people in our communities; assert that the Government’s duty to ensure nobody in our communities goes hungry should be reflected in legislation; and call on the Government to bring forward legislative proposals to enshrine the right to food in UK law.’

Amendment (e)

Richard Burgon

John McDonnell

Apsana Begum

Ian Lavery

Rebecca Long Bailey

Caroline Lucas

Tony LloydZarah SultanaAndy McDonaldIan MearnsMs Diane AbbottBarry GardinerBeth WinterIan ByrneNeale HanveyBell Ribeiro-AddyJeremy CorbynClaudia WebbeKenny MacAskillGrahame MorrisMick WhitleyLloyd Russell-MoyleJon TrickettNadia WhittomeMary Kelly FoyTommy SheppardMrs Emma Lewell-BuckMarsha De CordovaDan CardenJonathan Edwards

At end add ‘but respectfully regret that the Gracious Speech does not contain measures to properly tax the wealth of the very richest in this country and, noting that there are high levels of public support for a wealth tax, call on the Government to establish a wealth tax commission to examine the best ways of raising taxes from the very wealthiest and to bring forward a bill that fulfils this aim.’

Amendment (f)

Zarah Sultana

Ian Byrne

Andy McDonald

John McDonnell

Bell Ribeiro-Addy

Ian Lavery

Richard BurgonGrahame MorrisMick WhitleyRebecca Long BaileyClaudia WebbeApsana BegumLloyd Russell-MoyleBeth WinterMary Kelly FoyKim JohnsonJon Trickett

At end add ‘but respectfully regret that the Gracious Speech fails to include measures to address the cost of living crisis; note that energy bills rose by almost £700 in April and are projected to rise by £830 in October; note that inflation is running at 7 per cent and is expected to exceed 10 per cent in the autumn; and therefore call on the Government to revert to the lower pre-April energy price cap and promise no new energy price hike in October, raise the minimum wage to a real living wage, with a path to £15-an-hour, introduce a real-terms public sector pay increase, real-terms rise in pensions and social security payments, restore and extend the £20-a-week Universal Credit uplift to all benefits, enshrine the right to food in law to end food poverty, introduce rent controls and a plan to build at least 100,000 council homes a year, strengthen workers’ rights with a ban on fire-and-rehire and repeal all anti-union laws, bring rail, mail, energy and water into public ownership, raise taxes on the richest 5 per cent of earners and large corporations, introduce a windfall tax on oil and gas companies and end the non-domiciled residents tax status.’

Amendment (g)

Barry Gardiner

Ian Byrne

Dawn Butler

Richard Burgon

Ian Lavery

Mary Kelly Foy

Margaret GreenwoodGrahame MorrisJon TrickettMick WhitleyCaroline LucasLloyd Russell-MoyleBeth WinterBen LakeLiz Saville RobertsHywel WilliamsJonathan Edwards

At end add ‘but respectfully regret that the Gracious Speech fails to provide any legislative solutions to the cost of living crisis and the fact that 7.3 million people are in food insecurity; note that the Bank of England projects inflation of 10 per cent by the end of 2022 at a time when real wages have been falling and energy bills have already risen by £700 with utility companies predicting further rises of £1,000 this autumn; call on the Government to legislate for a right to food in order to address the devastating consequences of food poverty on the nation’s health and well-being; recognise the Government’s own figures estimate that 900,000 individuals, many of whom have disabilities, will become worse off as the result of the transition from legacy benefits to Universal Credit; and call on the Government to restore the £20 uplift to Universal Credit that it decided not to continue and protect the income of those adversely affected.’

Amendment (h)

Barry Gardiner

Ian Byrne

Dawn Butler

Richard Burgon

Ian Lavery

Mary Kelly Foy

Margaret GreenwoodGrahame MorrisJon TrickettMick WhitleyCaroline LucasLloyd Russell-MoyleBeth Winter

At end add ‘but respectfully regret that the Gracious Speech fails to provide any legislative solutions to the energy crisis, the climate crisis, or the housing crisis and the plight of residents trapped in accommodation with fire safety defects; urge the Government to step in to ensure urgent remediation at no cost to the residents who have been the victims of negligence by developers and construction companies; note the spiralling cost of home heating and the risk that energy inefficient homes continue to pose to the UK’s ability to meet its contribution to the 1.5°C Paris target; call for a windfall tax on oil and gas companies’ excess profits to pay for an immediate rollout of retrofitting energy efficiency measures to all homes in the UK and a reduction in the cost of utility bills; further note the high numbers of families on local authority housing waiting lists, the high level of no-fault evictions and a rise in street homelessness of 38 per cent since 2010 with a net loss of over 22,000 social homes across England; and urge the Government to build 100,000 new genuinely affordable homes a year to net zero standards on brownfield sites.’

Amendment (i)

Barry Gardiner

Ian Byrne

Dawn Butler

Richard Burgon

Ian Lavery

Mary Kelly Foy

Grahame MorrisJon TrickettMick WhitleyCaroline LucasLloyd Russell-MoyleBeth Winter

At end add ‘but respectfully regret that the Gracious Speech fails to introduce the employment bill as had been promised or to provide any legislative solutions to the lack of security in employment; recall the disgraceful treatment of workers by P&O Ferries and the failure of Government to protect workers in many large companies from unfair treatment; and therefore call on the Government to legislate to end the use of fire and rehire as a tactic to reduce workers’ wages and terms and conditions, to strengthen employment rights and to introduce sectoral collective bargaining and a minimum wage of £15 an hour.’

Amendment (j)

Barry Gardiner

Ian Byrne

Dawn Butler

Richard Burgon

Ian Lavery

Mary Kelly Foy

Margaret GreenwoodGrahame MorrisJon TrickettMick WhitleyCaroline LucasLloyd Russell-Moyle

At end add ‘but respectfully regret that the Gracious Speech fails to provide any legislative solutions to the backlog in the NHS; recall that the British Medical Association states that a record 6.1 million people who have been referred to a consultant are still awaiting treatment, two million of them over the 18 week maximum waiting time for non-urgent referrals and 300,000 already waiting over a year; and therefore call on the Government to expand the places available to train secondary care staff and to remedy the underfunding that had led to the waiting lists burgeoning to 4.43 million even before the covid-19 outbreak began.’

Amendment (k)

Barry Gardiner

Ian Byrne

Dawn Butler

Richard Burgon

Ian Lavery

Mary Kelly Foy

Margaret GreenwoodGrahame MorrisJon TrickettMick WhitleyCaroline LucasLloyd Russell-MoyleBeth Winter

At end add ‘but respectfully regret that the Gracious Speech fails to provide any legislative solutions to the serious imbalance in wealth and power entrenched in our society which stems from the appreciation in the value of land and which allows fewer than 6,000 people to own 60 per cent of all the land in the UK; urge the Government to commit to an open and transparent Land Registry without search fees, to reform of the Land Compensation Act 1961, so that councils are able to buy land at closer to existing use value thereby making the building of social housing much more affordable, and to improving regulation in the social and private rental sectors; recognise that it is by taxing labour rather than wealth that Government currently raises the largest part, 60 per cent, of its revenue; and therefore call on the Government to legislate for what Milton Friedman described as the least bad tax and begin to impose a land value tax on landholdings above 1,000 acres, initially to replace business rates and ultimately in order to tax wealth and unearned income so as to reduce the taxation of productive work through income tax and VAT.’

Amendment (l)

Ed Davey

Daisy Cooper

Wendy Chamberlain

Mr Alistair Carmichael

Tim Farron

Layla Moran

Christine JardineWera HobhouseJamie StoneSarah OlneyMunira WilsonSarah GreenHelen MorganLloyd Russell-Moyle

At end add ‘but respectfully regret that the Gracious Speech does not tackle the pressing issues facing communities up and down the country, fails to implement a windfall tax on oil and gas super profits and to introduce measures that would protect rural areas, such as preventing water companies from pumping sewage into rivers, waterways, and oceans; and further regret that the provisions of the Gracious Speech fail to protect households from the rising cost of heating oil, which is not capped, and to protect farmers who are being undercut by new trade deals, neglect to tackle recruitment in agriculture and fail to uphold animal welfare and environmental standards, do nothing to stop the proliferation of second homes and holiday cottages in rural communities, which results in a shortage of affordable homes, or to tackle the chronic shortage of dentists and GPs which results in patients facing long waits for essential treatment, and fail to address the growing waiting times for ambulances in rural areas and do nothing to reverse the closures of critical ambulance stations where these closures worsen ambulance waiting times.’

Amendment (m)

Ed Davey

Daisy Cooper

Wendy Chamberlain

Mr Alistair Carmichael

Tim Farron

Layla Moran

Christine JardineWera HobhouseJamie StoneSarah OlneyMunira WilsonSarah GreenHelen MorganLloyd Russell-Moyle

At end add ‘but respectfully regret that the Gracious Speech fails to support unpaid carers despite a Bill having been prepared, fails to tackle issues in SEND education provision and does nothing to ensure pupils affected by the pandemic get extra support to catch up missed education, is not sufficiently ambitious in tackling the cost of living crisis and should include provision for an emergency tax cut cutting the top rate of VAT from 20 per cent to 17.5 per cent; further regret that the Gracious Speech fails to tackle violence against women and girls, nor does it tackle fraud and scams, does nothing to provide safe and legal routes to sanctuary for refugees fleeing war and persecution, does nothing to tackle the chronic shortage of dentists and GPs which results in long waiting times for patients requiring essential treatment, ignores the growing waiting times for ambulances, does not reverse the misguided cut to the armed forces of up to 10,000 troops, and fails to restore with immediate effect the 0.7 per cent target of GNI for international development spending.’

Amendment (n)

Tim Farron

Caroline Lucas

Sir George Howarth

Claire Hanna

Colum Eastwood

Jim Shannon

Ian PaisleyGavin RobinsonGrahame MorrisCat SmithKate HollernMarsha De CordovaKim Johnson Neale Hanvey Stephen Farry Stephen Timms Dr Lisa Cameron

At end add ‘but, while welcoming the mental health bill brought forward in the Gracious Speech and the forthcoming scrutiny of its contents, respectfully regret that it did not include a strategy for reducing cancer waiting times as committed by the Government; are concerned by the continued downward trajectory of cancer waiting times since 2017; note that NHS operational standards requiring at least 85 per cent of cancer patients to be seen within 62 days have not been met for over five years; note the commitment to reach an average figure of 80 per cent of patients seen within 62 days by March 2023; and respectfully ask the Government to publish a strategy for how that target will be met.’

Amendment (o)

Margaret Greenwood

Jeremy Corbyn

Tony Lloyd

Rebecca Long Bailey

Ms Marie Rimmer

Ian Byrne

Apsana Begum Claudia Webbe Kate Hollern Grahame Morris Mick Whitley Nadia Whittome Richard Burgon Kim Johnson Helen Morgan

At end add ‘but respectfully regret that the Gracious Speech does not contain measures to deal with the crisis in adult literacy; note that the National Literacy Trust estimates that there are more than 7 million adults in England who have very poor literacy skills; recognise that people who struggle to read and write can face great hardship in life, for example through experiencing difficulty in undertaking a wide range of practical activities such as securing housing, dealing with utility companies, managing financial affairs and finding well paid employment; further note that they may be more vulnerable to exploitation by scammers and less able to access support and that their opportunity to express themselves and reach their full potential can be seriously curtailed; believe that it is in the interest of the UK economy to address this crisis; and call on the Government to bring forward legislative proposals requiring the Secretary of State for Education to, every two years, review levels of adult literacy in England, publish the findings of those reviews and set out a strategy to improve levels of adult literacy in England.’

Amendment (p)

Margaret Greenwood

Jeremy Corbyn

Tony Lloyd

Rebecca Long Bailey

Ms Marie Rimmer

Ian Byrne

Apsana Begum Claudia Webbe Kate Hollern Grahame Morris Mick Whitley Nadia Whittome Richard Burgon Kim Johnson

At end add ‘but respectfully regret that the Gracious Speech does not contain measures to ensure that people in England will be able to receive treatment at any A&E department they present at; note concerning reports about a woman being turned away from A&E because of the area in which she lived due to a protocol; further note with concern that this sets a precedent; believe that there should be no circumstances in which someone is turned away from A&E because they present at one that is not in their local area; further believe that people need to feel confident that, if they have an accident while they are away from home, they will be able to receive treatment at the nearest A&E; express regret that the Government did not accept an amendment to the previous session’s Health and Care Bill designed to ensure that any provider of health services could not withhold provision of services from any individual because of the Integrated Care Board to which they are allocated; remain extremely concerned that, because of this, there may be more cases whereby people are denied the emergency treatment that they need if they happen to be outside the area where they live when they seek treatment; and call on the Government to bring forward legislative proposals to ensure that people in England will be able to receive treatment at any A&E department they present at.’

Amendment (q)

Margaret Greenwood

Jeremy Corbyn

Tony Lloyd

Rebecca Long Bailey

Ms Marie Rimmer

Ian Byrne

Apsana Begum Claudia Webbe Kate Hollern Grahame Morris Mick Whitley Nadia Whittome Richard Burgon Kim Johnson

At end add ‘but respectfully regret that the Gracious Speech does not contain measures to ensure that the new NHS payment scheme, provided for in the Health and Care Act 2022, will not lead to an erosion of the scope of Agenda for Change; note that NHS England will be required to consult with each relevant provider, including private providers, before publishing the NHS payment scheme; are concerned that this will be a mechanism by which the Government will give private health companies the opportunity to undercut the NHS and that this may lead to an increase in the amount of healthcare that is currently provided by the NHS being delivered by the private sector; are further concerned about the impact of this on NHS staff who could potentially find themselves forced out of jobs that are currently on Agenda for Change rates of pay, pensions and other terms and conditions, with only private sector jobs with potentially lesser pay and conditions available for them to apply for if they wish to continue working in the health service; and call on the Government to bring forward legislation to ensure that the pay rates of Agenda for Change, pensions, and other terms and conditions of all eligible NHS staff are not undermined as a result of the NHS payment scheme.’

Amendment (r)

Margaret Greenwood

Caroline Lucas

Jeremy Corbyn

Tony Lloyd

Rebecca Long Bailey

Ms Marie Rimmer

Ian Byrne Apsana Begum Claudia Webbe Kate Hollern Grahame Morris Mick Whitley Nadia Whittome Richard Burgon Kim Johnson

At end add ‘but respectfully regret that the Gracious Speech does not contain measures to ban fracking and Underground Coal Gasification (UCG); recognise that fracking and UCG are strongly opposed by local communities and are detrimental to the environment and the fight against climate change; note that in May 2019, the Government announced a pause on fracking activity in England after a report by the Oil and Gas Authority found it was not possible to accurately predict the probability or magnitude of earthquakes linked to hydraulic fracturing operations; note with concern that the Government recently commissioned the British Geological Survey to advise on the latest scientific evidence around shale gas extraction; fear that this is the first step towards the Government allowing fracking to begin in the UK; and call on the Government to bring forward legislation to ban fracking and UCG once and for all.’

Amendment (s)

Ian Blackford

Kirsten Oswald

Stuart C McDonald

Kirsty Blackman

Carol Monaghan

Owen Thompson

Pete WishartStewart HosieAngus Brendan MacNeilHannah BardellMhairi BlackSteven BonnarDeidre BrockAlan BrownAmy CallaghanDr Lisa CameronDouglas ChapmanJoanna CherryRonnie CowanAngela CrawleyMartyn DayMartin Docherty-HughesDave DooganAllan DoransMarion FellowsStephen FlynnPatricia GibsonPatrick GradyPeter GrantDrew HendryChris LawStewart Malcolm McDonald David LindenAnne McLaughlinJohn McNallyGavin NewlandsJohn NicolsonBrendan O’HaraMs Anum QaisarTommy SheppardAlyn SmithChris StephensAlison ThewlissRichard ThomsonDr Philippa WhitfordLiz Saville RobertsJonathan Edwards

At end add ‘but respectfully regret that the Gracious Speech fails to include bills that protect workers’ rights, tackle the cost of living crisis, or the climate emergency; further regret that the Gracious Speech does not contain provision to uplift benefits and implement a windfall tax on companies which are benefiting from significantly increased profits as a result of impacts associated with the pandemic or the current international situation; and reject the proposals both for a Brexit Freedoms Bill, which will undermine devolution, and the Bill of Rights, which will weaken human rights protections.’

Amendment (t)

Nadia Whittome

Wera Hobhouse

David Linden

Mr Virendra Sharma

Lloyd Russell-Moyle

Mary Kelly Foy

Kim JohnsonApsana BegumBell Ribeiro-AddyRichard BurgonCharlotte NicholsBeth WinterCaroline Lucas Ed Davey John McDonnell Kim Leadbeater Clive Lewis Claudia Webbe

At end add ‘but respectfully regret that the Gracious Speech does not make clear that legislation to ban conversion therapy will apply to all; note the Government’s intention to ban the abhorrent practices of conversion therapy and that the Government’s National LGBT Survey found that trans people were twice as likely to be subjected to and offered conversion therapy than LGB people; and call on the Government to ensure that the proposed legislation on banning conversion therapy covers both sexual orientation and gender identity, and to ban the practice in all circumstances.’

Amendment (u)

Kim Johnson

John McDonnell

Jeremy Corbyn

Bell Ribeiro-Addy

Mick Whitley

Ian Lavery

Zarah SultanaRichard BurgonGrahame MorrisAndy McDonaldTahir AliIan MearnsRebecca Long BaileyApsana BegumClaudia WebbeClive LewisDawn ButlerNadia Whittome

At end add ‘but respectfully regret that the Gracious Speech fails to include measures to address skyrocketing child poverty, which is the main determinant of inequalities in educational attainment and a key barrier to effective education; note that the equivalent of nine children in every class of 30 are living in poverty; further note that the number of households with children not on Free School Meals who are now worried their children will have to go without lunch some days has quadrupled in the last two years; and that nearly four million children are now living in poverty, with a record-breaking two-thirds of these living in working families; and therefore call on the Government to raise the minimum wage to £15 per hour, reinstate and extend the £20 uplift to Universal Credit to all benefits, expand the Free School Meal scheme to include every child up to the age of 16 from a household in receipt of Universal Credit or equivalent benefits, eradicate holiday hunger by extending Free School Meal provision during all school holidays, ease the cost of living crisis by implementing universal free school meals for all primary children as in Wales, increase school funding to at least levels seen in 2009, and increase funding for early intervention and prevention initiatives.’

Amendment (v)

Keir Starmer

Angela Rayner

Rachel Reeves

Edward Miliband

Jonathan Ashworth

Sir Alan Campbell

Caroline Lucas

At end add ‘but respectfully regret that the Gracious Speech fails to announce a windfall tax on the profits of oil and gas producers, in order to provide much-needed relief from energy price increases for households.’

2. Road Traffic

No debate (Standing Order No. 118(6))

Secretary Grant Shapps

That the draft Civil Enforcement of Road Traffic Contraventions (Representations and Appeals) (England) Regulations 2022, which were laid before this House on 7 March in the last session of Parliament, be approved.

Notes:

If this item is opposed after 7.00pm, the division will be deferred.

3. Environmental Audit Committee

No debate after 7.00pm (Standing Order No. 9(6))

Sir Bill Wiggin, on behalf of the Committee of Selection

That Valerie Vaz be discharged from the Environmental Audit Committee and Anna McMorrin be added.

4. Joint Committee on the National Security Strategy

No debate after 7.00pm (Standing Order No. 9(6))

Sir Bill Wiggin, on behalf of the Committee of Selection

That Sir Edward Leigh be discharged from the Joint Committee of National Security Strategy and Stephen McPartland be added.

5. Justice Committee

No debate after 7.00pm (Standing Order No. 9(6))

Sir Bill Wiggin, on behalf of the Committee of Selection

That Andy Slaughter be discharged from the Justice Committee and Karl Turner be added.

6. Public Administration and Constitutional Affairs Committee

No debate after 7.00pm (Standing Order No. 9(6))

Sir Bill Wiggin, on behalf of the Committee of Selection

That Rachel Hopkins be discharged from the Public Administration and Constitutional Affairs Committee and Beth Winter be added.

7. Science and Technology Committee

No debate after 7.00pm (Standing Order No. 9(6))

Sir Bill Wiggin, on behalf of the Committee of Selection

That Mark Logan be discharged from the Science and Technology Committee and Tracey Crouch be added.

8. Transport Committee

No debate after 7.00pm (Standing Order No. 9(6))

Sir Bill Wiggin, on behalf of the Committee of Selection

That Navendu Mishra be discharged from the Transport Committee and Christian Wakeford be added.

ADJOURNMENT DEBATE

Until 7.30pm or for half an hour (whichever is later) (Standing Order No. 9(7))

Child maintenance arrears: Dr Kieran Mullan

Written Statements

STATEMENTS TO BE MADE TODAY

Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy

1.Departmental Contingent Liability Notification; Energy Supply Company Special Administration Regime

2.Ending BEIS ODA spending in China

Secretary of State for the Home Department

3.Public consultation on the code of practice for the extraction of information from electronic devices

4.Ratification of the Istanbul Convention

Secretary of State for Transport

5.The Motoring Agencies Business Plans for 2022-23

Notes:

Texts of Written Statements are available from the Vote Office and on the internet at https://questions-statements.parliament.uk/ .

Committees Meeting Today

Broadcasts of proceedings can be found at https://www.parliamentlive.tv/Commons

Some committee members and witnesses might now physically attend meetings, however, there is no public access at present.

Select Committees

Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Committee

Subject: Sustainability of local journalism

Witnesses: 10.00am: Owen Meredith, Chief Executive, News Media Association; David Powell, Chair, Local TV Network; Martin Steers, Co-Founder, UK Community Radio Network

11.00am: Adam Cantwell-Corn, Co-Founder, The Bristol Cable; Jonathan Heawood, Executive Director, Public Interest News Foundation; Michelle Stanistreet, General Secretary, National Union of Journalists

The Grimond Room, Portcullis House
9.30am (private), 10.00am (public)

Education Committee

Subject: The future of post-16 qualifications

Witnesses: 10.00am: Jane Gratton, Head of People Policy, British Chambers of Commerce; Lisa Silcock, Interim Group HR Manager, Naylor Industries PLC; Chris Pont, Founder and Chair, IJYI Ltd; Peter Cadwallader, Managing Director, The Port Hotel; Andy Webb, Managing Director, Skysmart; Matthew McCarrick, Director, McCarrick Construction Ltd; Steven Kearney, Director, SKARCHITECTS

Room 15
9.30am (private), 10.00am (public)

Public Administration and Constitutional Affairs Committee

Subject: Propriety of governance in light of Greensill

Witnesses: 10.00am: Rt Hon Sir Peter Riddell CBE, Former Commissioner for Public Appointments, Cabinet Office

Room 16
9.30am (private), 10.00am (public), 12.30pm (private)

Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy Committee

Subject: Help to Grow Scheme

Witnesses: 11.15am: Dr Anna Valero, Senior Policy Fellow, Centre for Economic Performance (London School of Economics); Neil Ross, Associate Director, Policy, techUK; Tina McKenzie, Policy & Advocacy Chair, Federation of Small Businesses; Adam Harper, Director of Professional Standards, Association of Accounting Technicians

Room 8
9.45am (private), 11.15am (public)

Committee on Standards

The Wilson Room, Portcullis House
9.45am (private)

Health and Social Care Committee

Subject: The impact of body image on mental and physical health

Witnesses: 10.00am: Charles King, lived experience witness

10.15am: Tam Fry, Chairman, National Obesity Forum; Dr Angela Meadows, Lecturer, Department of Psychology, University of Essex; Helen James, Founder, Nutriri

11.00am: Gillian Keegan MP, Minister for Care and Mental Health, Department of Health and Social Care

The Macmillan Room, Portcullis House
9.45am (private), 10.00am (public)

Finance Committee

The Thatcher Room, Portcullis House
12.30pm (private)

Defence Committee

Subject: National Shipbuilding Strategy Refresh

Witnesses: 2.45pm: Sir John Parker GBE FREng; Ian Waddell, General Secretary, The Confederation of Shipbuilding and Engineering Unions (CSEU); Richard Powell OBE, Chair, Maritime Defence and Security Group Council, Society of Maritime Industries (SMI)

Room 15
2.00pm (private), 2.45pm (public)

Environment, Food and Rural Affairs Committee

Subject: Work of the Environment Agency

Witnesses: 2.30pm: Emma Howard Boyd, Chair, and Sir James Bevan, Chief Executive, Environment Agency

Room 6
2.00pm (private), 2.30pm (public)

Foreign Affairs Committee

Subject: The FCDO’s approach to state level hostage situations

Witnesses: 2.30pm: Rt Hon Alistair Burt, Minister of State at the Department for International Development from June 2017 to March 2019, Former Minister of State for the Middle East, Foreign and Commonwealth Office

3.30pm: Rt Hon Jeremy Hunt MP

The Grimond Room, Portcullis House
2.00pm (private), 2.30pm (public)

Justice Committee

Subject: The work of the Criminal Justice Inspectorates

Witnesses: 2.30pm: Andrew Cayley CMG QC, HM Chief Inspector, HM Crown Prosecution Service Inspectorate; Andy Cooke QPM DL, HM Chief Inspector, HM Inspectorate of Constabulary and Fire and Rescue Services; Justin Russell, HM Chief Inspector, HM Inspectorate of Probation; Charlie Taylor, HM Chief Inspector, HM Inspectorate of Prisons

Room 8
2.00pm (private), 2.30pm (public)

Petitions Committee

Room 13
2.00pm (private)

Committee on Standards

The Wilson Room, Portcullis House
2.30pm (private)

Transport Committee

The Thatcher Room, Portcullis House
3.00pm (private)

Joint Committees

Parliamentary Works Estimates Commission

Room 5
1.30pm (private), 2.00pm (private)

Delegated Legislation Committees

First Delegated Legislation Committee

To consider the draft Alternative Finance (Income Tax, Capital Gains Tax and Corporation Tax) Order 2022

Room 12
2.30pm (public)

Committee Reports Published Today

EUROPEAN SCRUTINY

1st Report: Documents considered by the Committee 11 May 2022 HC 119-i
Time of publication: 11.00am

Announcements

FORTHCOMING END OF DAY ADJOURNMENT DEBATES

Tuesday 24 May to Thursday 26 May (deadline Wednesday 18 May 7.00pm or the rise of the House, whichever is earlier)

Applications should be made in writing to the Table Office. Members can submit their application via MemberHub, from their own email account or in hard copy. Application forms are available on the Table Office page on the Parliamentary intranet. The ballot will take place on Thursday 19 May.

FORTHCOMING DEPARTMENTS ANSWERING IN WESTMINSTER HALL

Applications for 90, 60 and 30-minute debates should be made to the Table Office by 10.00pm or rise of the House, whichever is the earlier, on the deadline dates listed below. Members can submit their application via MemberHub, from their own email account or in hard copy. Application forms are available on the Table Office page on the Parliamentary intranet.

The ballot takes place on the day following the deadline. Members will be informed of the outcome by the Speaker’s Office.

Tuesday 24 and Wednesday 25 May (ballot closed)

The ballot for Tuesday 24 and Wednesday 25 May will take place today. Applications for this ballot have now closed.

Tuesday 7 and Wednesday 8 June (deadline Monday 23 May 10.00pm or the rise of the House, whichever is earlier)

The following Departments will answer:

Attorney General; Defence; Digital, Culture, Media and Sport; Education; Health and Social Care; International Trade; Justice; Levelling Up, Housing and Communities; Scotland; Wales

Tuesday 14 and Wednesday 15 June (deadline Monday 6 June 10.00pm or the rise of the House, whichever is earlier)

The following Departments will answer:

Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy; Cabinet Office; Environment, Food and Rural Affairs; Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office; Home Office; Northern Ireland; Transport; Treasury; Women and Equalities; Work and Pensions

Tuesday 21 and Wednesday 22 June (deadline Monday 13 June 10.00pm or the rise of the House, whichever is earlier)

The following Departments will answer:

Attorney General; Defence; Digital, Culture, Media and Sport; Education; Health and Social Care; International Trade; Justice; Levelling Up, Housing and Communities; Scotland; Wales

PRIVATE MEMBERS’ BILLS

Ballot Bills

Event

Date and location

Ballot book entry

Tuesday 17 May and Wednesday 18 May, No Division lobby, from 11.30am until the rise of the House

Ballot draw

Thursday 19 May, 9.00am, Committee Room 15 (also broadcast live)

Presentation of ballot bills

Wednesday 15 June, immediately after questions and statements (if any)

Members may enter only one name into the ballot, either their own or that of another Member who has authorised them to do so, and no name may appear more than once. Neither a Bill nor Bill titles are required at this stage.

On the day of the ballot, the Chairman of Ways and Means will draw twenty names in reverse order. At about 9.30am on that day the list of successful Members will be available in the Vote Office and on the internet. Members successful in the ballot will be contacted by the Clerk of Private Members’ Bills.

First notices of ten minute rule motions and presentation of non-ballot bills

Event

Date and location

First notices of ten minute rule motions

Thursday 16 June, by email from the Member’s parliamentary email address to PBOHoC@parliament.uk, from 10.00am until the rise of the House

First notices of presentation bills (to be presented on or after Monday 20 June)

Thursday 16 June, by email from the Member’s parliamentary email address to PBOHoC@parliament.uk, from 10.00am until the rise of the House

There will be no physical queue for the first notices of ten minute rule motions or presentation bills.

A single notice (of either a ten minute rule motion OR a presentation bill) will be accepted from each Member from emails received from the Member’s parliamentary email address between 10.00 and 10.30am. After 10.30am, unlimited further notices will be accepted from emails received from the Member’s parliamentary email address at or after 10.00am in the order in which they were received.

Four ten minute rule slots will be available (for speeches on 28 June, 29 June, 5 July and 6 July).

Members interested in giving notice on 16 June should contact the Clerk of Private Members’ Bills in advance to agree bill titles (PBOHoC@parliament.uk, x3254).

Notes:

Arrangements made according to Standing Order No.14(10) and (11) and on the authority

of Mr Speaker.

ELECTION OF THE CHAIR OF THE ENVIRONMENT, FOOD AND RURAL AFFAIRS COMMITTEE

Nominations and ballot

Nominations must be received in writing in the Table Office or Public Bill Office by 12 noon on Tuesday 24 May. Nomination forms are available in those offices and in the Vote Office.

In accordance with the House’s decision of 16 January 2020 only members of the Conservative Party may be candidates in this election.

Each nomination shall consist of a signed statement (up to 500 words) made by the candidate declaring their willingness to stand for election, accompanied by the signatures of 15 Members elected to the House as members of the same party as the candidate. Statements may (optionally) be accompanied by signatures of up to five Members elected to the House as members of any party other than that to which the candidate belongs, or members of no party.

No Member may sign more than one such statement; if any Member does so, their signature will be invalidated for all nominations.

If there is more than one candidate, the ballot will take place between 11.00am and 2.30pm on Wednesday 25 May in the Aye division lobby.

As soon as practicable after the votes have been counted the Speaker will announce to the House the results of the ballot.

Further Information

Members’ Guide to Chamber proceedings

The Members’ Guide to Chamber proceedings is available on the Parliamentary website

Business of the Day

Documents and reports relating to the business being held in the Chamber are available on the Commons Business Briefings webpage: www.parliament.uk/business/publications/research/commons-business-briefings/

Written Statements

Text of today’s Written Statements: https://questions-statements.parliament.uk/

Select Committees

Select Committees Webpage: https://committees.parliament.uk/

Standing Orders Relating to Public Business

Text of Standing Orders relating to public business: https://publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm5802/cmstords/so_804_2021/so-804_02122021.pdf

European Business

European Business Referrals and Motion documents for consideration by European Committees or on the Floor of the House are available on the European Business
webpage: https://old.parliament.uk/business/publications/business-papers/commons/european-business11/

Chamber Engagement

Information about engaging the public with debates is available on the parliamentary website: https://www.parliament.uk/get-involved/have-your-say-on-laws/chamber-engagement/.

All business papers are available via the HousePapers app on mobile devices

Part 2: Future Business

A. CALENDAR OF BUSINESS

Business in either Chamber may be changed, and further business added, up to the rising of the House on the day before it is to be taken, and is therefore provisional.

Government items of business in this section have nominally been set down for
today, but are expected to be taken on the dates stated.

B. REMAINING ORDERS AND NOTICES

Business in this section has not yet been scheduled for a specific date. It has been nominally set down for today but is not expected to be taken today.

A. Calendar of Business

Business in either Chamber may be changed, and further business added, up to the rising of the House on the day before it is to be taken, and is therefore provisional.

WEDNESDAY 18 MAY

CHAMBER

QUESTIONS

11.30am Questions to the Secretary of State for Scotland

12 noon Questions to the Prime Minister

Afterwards

QUEEN’S SPEECH (MOTION FOR AN ADDRESS): CONCLUSION OF ADJOURNED DEBATE

Proposed subject for debate: Achieving economic growth

ADJOURNMENT DEBATE

Contribution of UK songwriters and composers to culture and the economy: Kevin Brennan

THURSDAY 19 MAY

CHAMBER

QUESTIONS

9.30am Questions to the Secretary of State for Transport

10.15am Topical Questions to the Secretary of State for Transport

Afterwards

GENERAL DEBATE ON TRANSPORT

The Prime Minister

That this House has considered transport.

GENERAL DEBATE ON NATO AND INTERNATIONAL SECURITY

The Prime Minister

That this House has considered NATO and international security.

Relevant Documents:

Fifty-Second Report of the Committee of Public Accounts, Session 2021-22, Ministry of Defence Equipment Plan 2021-31, HC 1164

PRESENTATION OF PUBLIC PETITIONS

Waverley Junior Academy: Alexander Stafford

ADJOURNMENT DEBATE

East Suffolk and Wherry railway lines: Peter Aldous

WESTMINSTER HALL

1.30pm That this House has considered reforms to Child Maintenance Service: Marion Fellows

3.15pm That this House has considered dialysis care outcomes: Jim Shannon

Notes:

The subjects for these debates were allocated by the Chairman of Ways and Means.

The sitting will be suspended and time added if divisions take place in the main Chamber (Standing Order No. 10(3)).

MONDAY 23 MAY

CHAMBER

QUESTIONS

2.30pm Questions to the Secretary of State for Education

3.15pm Topical Questions to the Secretary of State for Education

Afterwards

Public Order Bill: Second Reading

ADJOURNMENT DEBATE

Operation of the Births and Deaths Registration Act 1953: Mrs Emma Lewell-Buck

WESTMINSTER HALL

4.30pm That this House has considered e-petition 580220, relating to legal recognition of non-binary gender identities: Nick Fletcher, on behalf of the Petitions Committee

Relevant Documents:

Third Report of the Women and Equalities Committee, Session 2021–22, Reform of the Gender Recognition Act, HC 977, and the Government response, HC 129

6.00pm That this House has considered e-petition 599089, relating to taxes on motor fuel: Tonia Antoniazzi, on behalf of the Petitions Committee

Relevant Documents:

Written Evidence: Summary of public engagement by the Petitions Committee on the impact of increases in the cost of motor fuel, reported to the House on 12 May 2022, HC 73

Notes:

The subjects for these debates were determined by the Petitions Committee. The sitting will last for up to three hours. The sitting will be suspended and time added if divisions take place in the main Chamber (Standing Order No. 10(3)).

TUESDAY 24 MAY

CHAMBER

QUESTIONS

11.30am Questions to the Secretary of State for Justice

12.15pm Topical Questions to the Secretary of State for Justice

Afterwards

SECOND READING OF A BILL

WEDNESDAY 25 MAY

CHAMBER

QUESTIONS

11.30am Questions to the Secretary of State for Wales

12 noon Questions to the Prime Minister

Afterwards

REMAINING STAGES OF THE PRODUCT SECURITY AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS INFRASTRUCTURE BILL

Notes:

Queen’s Consent to be signified on Third Reading.

GENERAL DEBATE ON UKRAINE

The Prime Minister

That this House has considered Ukraine.

THURSDAY 26 MAY

CHAMBER

QUESTIONS

9.30am Questions to the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport

10.00am Topical Questions to the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport

10.10am Questions to the Attorney General

Afterwards

AN HUMBLE ADDRESS TO CELEBRATE THE PLATINUM JUBILEE OF HER MAJESTY THE QUEEN

The Prime Minister

MONDAY 6 JUNE

CHAMBER

QUESTIONS

2.30pm Questions to the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions

3.15pm Topical Questions to the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions

TUESDAY 7 JUNE

CHAMBER

QUESTIONS

11.30am Questions to the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy

12.15pm Topical Questions to the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy

WEDNESDAY 8 JUNE

CHAMBER

QUESTIONS

11.30am Questions to the Minister for Women and Equalities

11.53am Topical Questions to the Minister for Women and Equalities

12 noon Questions to the Prime Minister

THURSDAY 9 JUNE

CHAMBER

QUESTIONS

9.30am Questions to the Minister for the Cabinet Office

10.15am Topical Questions to the Minister for the Cabinet Office

MONDAY 13 JUNE

CHAMBER

QUESTIONS

2.30pm Questions to the Secretary of State for Defence

3.15pm Topical Questions to the Secretary of State for Defence

TUESDAY 14 JUNE

CHAMBER

QUESTIONS

11.30am Questions to the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care

12.15pm Topical Questions to the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care

WEDNESDAY 15 JUNE

CHAMBER

QUESTIONS

11.30am Questions to the President of COP26

11.53am Topical Questions to the President of COP26

12 noon Questions to the Prime Minister

THURSDAY 16 JUNE

CHAMBER

QUESTIONS

9.30am Questions to the Secretary of State for International Trade

10.15am Topical Questions to the Secretary of State for International Trade

MONDAY 20 JUNE

CHAMBER

QUESTIONS

2.30pm Questions to the Secretary of State for the Home Department

3.15pm Topical Questions to the Secretary of State for the Home Department

TUESDAY 21 JUNE

CHAMBER

QUESTIONS

11.30am Questions to the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs

12.15pm Topical Questions to the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs

WEDNESDAY 22 JUNE

CHAMBER

QUESTIONS

11.30am Questions to the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland

12 noon Questions to the Prime Minister

THURSDAY 23 JUNE

CHAMBER

QUESTIONS

9.30am Questions to the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs

10.00am Topical Questions to the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs

10.10am Questions to Church Commissioners, House of Commons Commission, Parliamentary Works Sponsor Body, Public Accounts Commission and Speaker’s Committee on the Electoral Commission

MONDAY 27 JUNE

CHAMBER

QUESTIONS

2.30pm Questions to the Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities

3.15pm Topical Questions to the Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities

TUESDAY 28 JUNE

CHAMBER

QUESTIONS

11.30am Questions to the Chancellor of the Exchequer

12.15pm Topical Questions to the Chancellor of the Exchequer

WEDNESDAY 29 JUNE

CHAMBER

QUESTIONS

11.30am Questions to the Secretary of State for Scotland

12 noon Questions to the Prime Minister

THURSDAY 30 JUNE

CHAMBER

QUESTIONS

9.30am Questions to the Secretary of State for Transport

10.15am Topical Questions to the Secretary of State for Transport

MONDAY 4 JULY

CHAMBER

QUESTIONS

2.30pm Questions to the Secretary of State for Education

3.15pm Topical Questions to the Secretary of State for Education

TUESDAY 5 JULY

CHAMBER

QUESTIONS

11.30am Questions to the Secretary of State for Justice

12.15pm Topical Questions to the Secretary of State for Justice

WEDNESDAY 6 JULY

CHAMBER

QUESTIONS

11.30am Questions to the Secretary of State for Wales

12 noon Questions to the Prime Minister

THURSDAY 7 JULY

CHAMBER

QUESTIONS

9.30am Questions to the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport

10.00am Topical Questions to the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport

10.10am Questions to the Attorney General

MONDAY 11 JULY

CHAMBER

QUESTIONS

2.30pm Questions to the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions

3.15pm Topical Questions to the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions

TUESDAY 12 JULY

CHAMBER

QUESTIONS

11.30am Questions to the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy

12.15pm Topical Questions to the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy

WEDNESDAY 13 JULY

CHAMBER

QUESTIONS

11.30am Questions to the Minister for Women and Equalities

11.53am Topical Questions to the Minister for Women and Equalities

12 noon Questions to the Prime Minister

THURSDAY 14 JULY

CHAMBER

QUESTIONS

9.30am Questions to the Minister for the Cabinet Office

10.15am Topical Questions to the Minister for the Cabinet Office

B. Remaining Orders and Notices

Business in this section has not yet been scheduled for a specific date. It has therefore been set down formally to be taken in the Chamber today but is not expected to be taken today.

1. Passports

Secretary Priti Patel

That the draft Passport (Fees) Regulations 2022, which were laid before this House on 25 April in the last session of Parliament, be approved.

2. Electricity

Secretary Kwasi Kwarteng

That the draft Contracts for Difference (Miscellaneous Amendments) Regulations 2022, which were laid before this House on 31 March in the last session of Parliament, be approved.

Notes:

The instrument has not yet been considered by the Joint Committee on Statutory Instruments.

3. Electronic Information

Secretary Kwasi Kwarteng

That the draft Internal Markets Information System Regulation (Amendment etc.) Regulations 2021, which were laid before this House on 20 July 2021 in the last session of Parliament, be approved.

4. Environmental Protection

Secretary Kwasi Kwarteng

That the draft Pollution Prevention and Control (Fees) (Miscellaneous Amendments) Regulations 2022, which were laid before this House on 25 April in the last session of Parliament, be approved.

5. Income Tax

John Glen

That the draft Alternative Finance (Income Tax, Capital Gains Tax and Corporation Tax) Order 2022, which was laid before this House on 28 March in the last session of Parliament, be approved.

Notes:

The instrument has not yet been considered by the Select Committee on Statutory Instruments.

6. Sanctions

Secretary Elizabeth Truss

That the Russia (Sanctions) (EU Exit) (Amendment) (No. 9) Regulations 2022 (SI, 2022, No. 477), a copy of which was laid before this House on 27 April in the last session of Parliament, be approved.

Notes

The instrument has not yet been considered by the Joint Committee on Statutory Instruments.

7. Medicines

Maria Caulfield

That the draft Pharmacy (Preparation and Dispensing Errors - Hospital and Other Pharmacy Services) Order 2022, which was laid before this House on 28 April in the last session of Parliament, be approved.

Notes

The instrument has not yet been considered by the Joint Committee on Statutory Instruments.

8. Medicines

Maria Caulfield

That the draft Pharmacy (Responsible Pharmacists, Superintendent Pharmacists etc.) Order 2022, which was laid before this House on 28 April in the last session of Parliament, be approved.

Notes

The instrument has not yet been considered by the Joint Committee on Statutory Instruments.

9. Exiting the European Union (Customs)

Secretary George Eustice

That the draft International Waste Shipments (Amendment) (EU Exit) Regulations 2021, which were laid before this House on 17 December 2020 in a previous session of Parliament, be approved.

10. Agriculture

Secretary George Eustice

That the draft Import of Animals and Animal Products and Approved Countries (Amendment) Regulations 2022, which were laid before this House on 30 March in the last session of Parliament, be approved.

Notes

The instrument has not yet been considered by the Joint Committee on Statutory Instruments.

11. Agriculture

Secretary George Eustice

That the draft Agriculture and Horticulture Development Board (Amendment) Order 2022, which was laid before this House on 29 March in the last session of Parliament, be approved.

Notes

The instrument has not yet been considered by the Joint Committee on Statutory Instruments.

12. Agriculture

Secretary George Eustice

That the draft Common Agricultural Policy (Cross-Compliance Exemptions and Transitional Regulation) (Amendment) (EU Exit) Regulations 2022, which were laid before this House on 11 May, be approved.

Notes

The instrument has not yet been considered by the Joint Committee on Statutory Instruments.

13. Construction

Secretary Kwasi Kwarteng

That the draft Construction Contracts (England) Exclusion Order 2022, which was laid before this House on 11 May, be approved.

Notes

The instrument has not yet been considered by the Joint Committee on Statutory Instruments.

14. Electricity

Secretary Kwasi Kwarteng

That the draft Contracts for Difference (Allocation) and Electricity Market Reform (General) (Amendment) Regulations 2022, which were laid before this House on 11 May, be approved.

Notes

The instrument has not yet been considered by the Joint Committee on Statutory Instruments.

15. High Speed Rail (Crewe - Manchester) Bill: Second Reading

Notes

Queen’s and Prince of Wales’ consent to be signified on Third Reading.

16. Levelling-up and Regeneration Bill: Second Reading

Notes

Queen’s and Prince of Wales’ consent to be signified on Third Reading.

17. National Security Bill: Second Reading

18. National Security Bill: Money

Lucy Frazer

That, for the purposes of any Act resulting from the National Security Bill, it is expedient to authorise:

(1)the payment out of money provided by Parliament of:

(a) any expenditure incurred under or by virtue of the Act by a Minister of the Crown; and

(b) any increase attributable to the Act in the sums payable under any other Act out of money so provided; and

(2)the payment of sums into the Consolidated Fund.

Notes:

Queen’s Recommendation signified.

19. Road Traffic

Secretary Grant Shapps

That the draft Goods Vehicles (Licensing of Operators) (Amendment) (No. 2) Regulations 2022, which were laid before this House on 11 May, be approved.

Notes

The instrument has not yet been considered by the Joint Committee on Statutory Instruments.

20. Trade (Australia and New Zealand) Bill: Second Reading

21. Road Traffic

Secretary Grant Shapps

That the draft Motor Vehicles (International Circulation) (Amendment) Order 2022, which was laid before this House on 11 May, be approved.

Notes

The instrument has not yet been considered by the Joint Committee on Statutory Instruments.

22. National Health Service

Edward Argar

That the draft National Health Service (Integrated Care Boards: Exceptions to Core Responsibility) Regulations 2022, which were laid before this House on 11 May, be approved.

Notes

The instrument has not yet been considered by the Joint Committee on Statutory Instruments.

23. Prevention and Suppression of Terrorism

Secretary Priti Patel

That the draft Police, Crime, Sentencing and Courts Act 2022 (Consequential Provision) Regulations 2022, which were laid before this House on 11 May, be approved.

Notes

The instrument has not yet been considered by the Joint Committee on Statutory Instruments.

24. Energy

Kemi Badenoch

That the draft Smoke and Carbon Monoxide Alarm (Amendment) Regulations 2022, which were laid before this House on 11 May, be approved.

Notes

The instrument has not yet been considered by the Joint Committee on Statutory Instruments.

25. Prevention and Suppression of Terrorism

Secretary Priti Patel

That the draft Terrorism Act 2000 (Code of Practice for Examining Officers and Review Officers) Order 2022, which was laid before this House on 11 May, be approved.

Notes

The instrument has not yet been considered by the Joint Committee on Statutory Instruments.

26. Higher Education (Freedom of Speech) Bill: Remaining Stages

Notes:

For amendments, see separate paper (also available on the documents webpage for the Bill). Proceedings on Consideration shall (so far as not previously concluded) be brought to a conclusion one hour before the moment of interruption on the day on which proceedings on Consideration are commenced. Proceedings on Third Reading shall (so far as not previously concluded) be brought to a conclusion at the moment of interruption on that day (Order of 12 July 2021)

27. Animal Welfare (Kept Animals) Bill: Remaining Stages

Notes:

For amendments, see separate paper (also available on the documents webpage for the Bill). Queen’s consent to be signified on Third Reading. Proceedings on Consideration shall (so far as not previously concluded) be brought to a conclusion one hour before the moment of interruption on the day on which those proceedings are commenced. Proceedings on Third Reading shall (so far as not previously concluded) be brought to a conclusion at the moment of interruption on that day. (Order of 25 October 2021).

The Scottish Parliament has approved a Legislative Consent Resolution relating to this Bill. Copies of the Resolution are available in the Vote Office (also available on the documents webpage for the Bill).

28. Regulatory Reform

Secretary Grant Shapps

That the draft Legislative Reform (Provision of Information etc. Relating to Disabilities) Order 2022, which was laid before this House on 12 May, be approved.

Notes:

A 40-day period must elapse before the motion to approve this draft order can be moved in the House.

29. Hovercraft

Secretary Grant Shapps

That the draft Hovercraft (Application of Enactments) and Merchant Shipping (Prevention of Pollution) (Law of the Sea Convention) Amendment Order 2022, which was laid before this House on 12 May, be approved.

Notes:

The instrument has not yet been considered by the Joint Committee on Statutory Instruments.

30. Electricity

Secretary Kwasi Kwarteng

That the draft Warm Home Discount (England and Wales) Regulations 2022, which were laid before this House on 12 May, be approved.

Notes:

The instrument has not yet been considered by the Joint Committee on Statutory Instruments.

31. Public Procurement

Mr Jacob Rees-Mogg

That the draft Public Procurement (International Trade Agreements) (Amendment) Regulations 2022, which were laid before this House on 25 April in the last session of Parliament, be approved.

Notes:

The instrument has not yet been considered by the Joint Committee on Statutory Instruments.

32. Northern Ireland Troubles (Legacy and Reconciliation) Bill: Money

Lucy Frazer

That, for the purposes of any Act resulting from the Northern Ireland Troubles (Legacy and Reconciliation) Bill, it is expedient to authorise:

(1)the payment out of money provided by Parliament of:

(a) any expenditure incurred under or by virtue of the Act by the Secretary of State or any other public authority, and

(b) any increase attributable to the Act in the sums payable under any other Act out of money so provided, and

(2)the payment of sums into the Consolidated Fund.

Notes:

Queen’s Recommendation signified.