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Part 1: Business Today

Summary Agenda: Chamber

Business Today: Chamber

11.30am Prayers

Followed by

QUESTIONS

Oral Questions to the Secretary of State for Scotland

1Dr James Davies (Vale of Clwyd)
What recent discussions he has had with Cabinet colleagues on the impact of the UK Shared Prosperity Fund on regional inequality in Scotland. (900000)

2Sally-Ann Hart (Hastings and Rye)
What recent discussions he has had with Cabinet colleagues on future defence policy and the role of the armed forces in Scotland. (900001)

3Saqib Bhatti (Meriden)
What recent discussions he has had with Cabinet colleagues on the effect of the Government's Energy Security Strategy on Scotland. (900002)

4Robin Millar (Aberconwy)
What recent discussions he has had with Cabinet colleagues on improving Union connectivity. (900003)

5Gavin Newlands (Paisley and Renfrewshire North)
What recent discussions he has had with the Scottish Government on tackling rises in the cost of living. (900004)

6Katherine Fletcher (South Ribble)
What recent discussions he has had with Cabinet colleagues on improving Union connectivity. (900005)

7Rachael Maskell (York Central)
What steps he is taking with Cabinet colleagues to improve transport connectivity between Scotland and England. (900006)

8Rob Roberts (Delyn)
What recent discussions he has had with Cabinet colleagues on improving Union connectivity. (900007)

9Christine Jardine (Edinburgh West)
What recent discussions he has had with the Scottish Government on providing additional support to Scottish businesses. (900008)

10Kenny MacAskill (East Lothian)
What recent discussions he has had with Cabinet colleagues on the progress on proposals for the Eastern high voltage subsea cable from Scotland to England. (900009)

11Dehenna Davison (Bishop Auckland)
What recent discussions he has had with Cabinet colleagues on improving Union connectivity. (900010)

12Afzal Khan (Manchester, Gorton)
What recent discussions he has had with the Scottish Government on tackling Islamophobia in Scotland. (900011)

13Tom Randall (Gedling)
What recent discussions he has had with Cabinet colleagues on the effect of the Government's Energy Security Strategy on Scotland. (900012)

14Dr Jamie Wallis (Bridgend)
What recent discussions he has had with Cabinet colleagues on the potential economic impact of the two proposed new freeports in Scotland. (900013)

15Mark Jenkinson (Workington)
What recent discussions he has had with Cabinet colleagues on improving Union connectivity. (900014)

At 12 noon

Oral Questions to the Prime Minister

Q1 Steve McCabe (Birmingham, Selly Oak)
If he will list his official engagements for Wednesday 18 May. (900086)

Q2 Elliot Colburn (Carshalton and Wallington) (900087)

Q3 Katherine Fletcher (South Ribble) (900088)

Q4 Dr Luke Evans (Bosworth) (900089)

Q5 Mr Virendra Sharma (Ealing, Southall) (900090)

Q6 Ruth Jones (Newport West) (900091)

Q7 Julie Marson (Hertford and Stortford) (900092)

Q8 Mr Richard Holden (North West Durham) (900093)

Q9 Tom Randall (Gedling) (900094)

Q10 Alex Sobel (Leeds North West) (900095)

Q11 Robbie Moore (Keighley) (900096)

Q12 Richard Thomson (Gordon) (900097)

Q13 Andy Carter (Warrington South) (900098)

Q14 Hannah Bardell (Livingston) (900099)

URGENT QUESTIONS AND STATEMENTS

12.30pm

Ministerial Statements, including on:

Foreign National Offender removal flights (Minister for Justice and Tackling Illegal Migration)

BUSINESS OF THE DAY

1. QUEEN’S SPEECH (MOTION FOR AN ADDRESS): ADJOURNED DEBATE [17 MAY]

Until 7.00pm (Standing Order No. 9(3))

Proposed subject for debate: Achieving economic growth

That an Humble Address be presented to Her Majesty, as follows:

Most Gracious Sovereign,

We, Your Majesty’s most dutiful and loyal subjects, the Commons of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland in Parliament assembled, beg leave to offer our humble thanks to Your Majesty for the Gracious Speech which was addressed to both Houses of Parliament.

Amendment (a)

Caroline Lucas

Wera Hobhouse

Mick Whitley

Lloyd Russell-Moyle

Beth Winter

Nadia Whittome

Kim JohnsonTommy SheppardMary Kelly FoyTony LloydDouglas ChapmanRichard BurgonZarah SultanaBen LakeJonathan EdwardsStephen FarryIan Byrne

At end add ‘but respectfully regret that the Gracious Speech did not deliver the urgent transformative action required in response to the climate and nature emergencies, and if the UK is to do its fair share to limit global temperature rise to 1.5°C; note with alarm the UN warning that governments plan to produce over twice the amount of fossil fuels in 2030 than is consistent with the 1.5°C target; further note that one million plant and animal species face extinction and that access to nature is profoundly unequal and that only 8 per cent of land in England is open access; and therefore call on the Government to bring forward a Climate and Ecology Bill to provide an evidence-based statutory framework to meet international climate and nature responsibilities, to enact a Green New Deal to restructure and decarbonise the economy, restore nature and launch a building retrofit revolution, to end any new coal, oil, or gas licences and abolish the duty to Maximise Economic Recovery, to support the international Fossil Fuel Non-Proliferation Treaty and the principle of a just transition, and extend the Countryside and Rights of Way Act 2000 to include rivers, woods, more grassland and Green Belt.’

Amendment (d)

Ian Byrne

Beth Winter

Dan Carden

Ms Diane Abbott

Geraint Davies

Ian Lavery

Grahame MorrisZarah SultanaBell Ribeiro-AddyJohn McDonnellIan MearnsAndy McDonaldBarry GardinerClaudia WebbeRichard BurgonMick WhitleyMs Marie RimmerTony LloydApsana BegumRebecca Long BaileyKate HollernSir George HowarthYvonne FovargueYasmin QureshiPeter DowdSir Mark HendrickRosie DuffieldJeremy CorbynCaroline LucasLloyd Russell-MoyleMary Kelly FoyDavid LindenKate OsamorValerie VazTahir AliNeale HanveyMarsha De CordovaCharlotte NicholsMrs Emma Lewell-BuckJon TrickettBen LakeLiz Saville RobertsHywel WilliamsJonathan EdwardsMargaret GreenwoodNadia WhittomeKim LeadbeaterStephen FarryRosie CooperKim JohnsonAfzal Khan

At end add ‘but respectfully regret that the Gracious Speech does not contain measures to properly address the crisis of food poverty and the rising cost of living; acknowledge the profound and devastating consequences of food poverty on the health, wellbeing and livelihoods of people in our communities; assert that the Government’s duty to ensure nobody in our communities goes hungry should be reflected in legislation; and call on the Government to bring forward legislative proposals to enshrine the right to food in UK law.’

Amendment (e)

Richard Burgon

John McDonnell

Apsana Begum

Ian Lavery

Rebecca Long Bailey

Caroline Lucas

Tony LloydZarah SultanaAndy McDonaldIan MearnsMs Diane AbbottBarry GardinerBeth WinterIan ByrneNeale HanveyBell Ribeiro-AddyJeremy CorbynClaudia WebbeKenny MacAskillGrahame MorrisMick WhitleyLloyd Russell-MoyleJon TrickettNadia WhittomeMary Kelly FoyTommy SheppardMrs Emma Lewell-BuckMarsha De CordovaDan CardenJonathan EdwardsStephen Farry

At end add ‘but respectfully regret that the Gracious Speech does not contain measures to properly tax the wealth of the very richest in this country and, noting that there are high levels of public support for a wealth tax, call on the Government to establish a wealth tax commission to examine the best ways of raising taxes from the very wealthiest and to bring forward a bill that fulfils this aim.’

Amendment (f)

Zarah Sultana

Ian Byrne

Andy McDonald

John McDonnell

Bell Ribeiro-Addy

Ian Lavery

Richard BurgonGrahame MorrisMick WhitleyRebecca Long BaileyClaudia WebbeApsana BegumLloyd Russell-MoyleBeth WinterMary Kelly FoyKim JohnsonJon TrickettNadia Whittome

At end add ‘but respectfully regret that the Gracious Speech fails to include measures to address the cost of living crisis; note that energy bills rose by almost £700 in April and are projected to rise by £830 in October; note that inflation is running at 7 per cent and is expected to exceed 10 per cent in the autumn; and therefore call on the Government to revert to the lower pre-April energy price cap and promise no new energy price hike in October, raise the minimum wage to a real living wage, with a path to £15-an-hour, introduce a real-terms public sector pay increase, real-terms rise in pensions and social security payments, restore and extend the £20-a-week Universal Credit uplift to all benefits, enshrine the right to food in law to end food poverty, introduce rent controls and a plan to build at least 100,000 council homes a year, strengthen workers’ rights with a ban on fire-and-rehire and repeal all anti-union laws, bring rail, mail, energy and water into public ownership, raise taxes on the richest 5 per cent of earners and large corporations, introduce a windfall tax on oil and gas companies and end the non-domiciled residents tax status.’

Amendment (g)

Barry Gardiner

Ian Byrne

Dawn Butler

Richard Burgon

Ian Lavery

Mary Kelly Foy

Margaret GreenwoodGrahame MorrisJon TrickettMick WhitleyCaroline LucasLloyd Russell-MoyleBeth WinterBen LakeLiz Saville RobertsHywel WilliamsJonathan EdwardsStephen Farry

At end add ‘but respectfully regret that the Gracious Speech fails to provide any legislative solutions to the cost of living crisis and the fact that 7.3 million people are in food insecurity; note that the Bank of England projects inflation of 10 per cent by the end of 2022 at a time when real wages have been falling and energy bills have already risen by £700 with utility companies predicting further rises of £1,000 this autumn; call on the Government to legislate for a right to food in order to address the devastating consequences of food poverty on the nation’s health and well-being; recognise the Government’s own figures estimate that 900,000 individuals, many of whom have disabilities, will become worse off as the result of the transition from legacy benefits to Universal Credit; and call on the Government to restore the £20 uplift to Universal Credit that it decided not to continue and protect the income of those adversely affected.’

Amendment (h)

Barry Gardiner

Ian Byrne

Dawn Butler

Richard Burgon

Ian Lavery

Mary Kelly Foy

Margaret GreenwoodGrahame MorrisJon TrickettMick WhitleyCaroline LucasLloyd Russell-MoyleBeth Winter

At end add ‘but respectfully regret that the Gracious Speech fails to provide any legislative solutions to the energy crisis, the climate crisis, or the housing crisis and the plight of residents trapped in accommodation with fire safety defects; urge the Government to step in to ensure urgent remediation at no cost to the residents who have been the victims of negligence by developers and construction companies; note the spiralling cost of home heating and the risk that energy inefficient homes continue to pose to the UK’s ability to meet its contribution to the 1.5°C Paris target; call for a windfall tax on oil and gas companies’ excess profits to pay for an immediate rollout of retrofitting energy efficiency measures to all homes in the UK and a reduction in the cost of utility bills; further note the high numbers of families on local authority housing waiting lists, the high level of no-fault evictions and a rise in street homelessness of 38 per cent since 2010 with a net loss of over 22,000 social homes across England; and urge the Government to build 100,000 new genuinely affordable homes a year to net zero standards on brownfield sites.’

Amendment (i)

Barry Gardiner

Ian Byrne

Dawn Butler

Richard Burgon

Ian Lavery

Mary Kelly Foy

Grahame MorrisJon TrickettMick WhitleyCaroline LucasLloyd Russell-MoyleBeth WinterStephen Farry

At end add ‘but respectfully regret that the Gracious Speech fails to introduce the employment bill as had been promised or to provide any legislative solutions to the lack of security in employment; recall the disgraceful treatment of workers by P&O Ferries and the failure of Government to protect workers in many large companies from unfair treatment; and therefore call on the Government to legislate to end the use of fire and rehire as a tactic to reduce workers’ wages and terms and conditions, to strengthen employment rights and to introduce sectoral collective bargaining and a minimum wage of £15 an hour.’

Amendment (j)

Barry Gardiner

Ian Byrne

Dawn Butler

Richard Burgon

Ian Lavery

Mary Kelly Foy

Margaret GreenwoodGrahame MorrisJon TrickettMick WhitleyCaroline LucasLloyd Russell-MoyleStephen Farry

At end add ‘but respectfully regret that the Gracious Speech fails to provide any legislative solutions to the backlog in the NHS; recall that the British Medical Association states that a record 6.1 million people who have been referred to a consultant are still awaiting treatment, two million of them over the 18 week maximum waiting time for non-urgent referrals and 300,000 already waiting over a year; and therefore call on the Government to expand the places available to train secondary care staff and to remedy the underfunding that had led to the waiting lists burgeoning to 4.43 million even before the covid-19 outbreak began.’

Amendment (k)

Barry Gardiner

Ian Byrne

Dawn Butler

Richard Burgon

Ian Lavery

Mary Kelly Foy

Margaret GreenwoodGrahame MorrisJon TrickettMick WhitleyCaroline LucasLloyd Russell-MoyleBeth Winter

At end add ‘but respectfully regret that the Gracious Speech fails to provide any legislative solutions to the serious imbalance in wealth and power entrenched in our society which stems from the appreciation in the value of land and which allows fewer than 6,000 people to own 60 per cent of all the land in the UK; urge the Government to commit to an open and transparent Land Registry without search fees, to reform of the Land Compensation Act 1961, so that councils are able to buy land at closer to existing use value thereby making the building of social housing much more affordable, and to improving regulation in the social and private rental sectors; recognise that it is by taxing labour rather than wealth that Government currently raises the largest part, 60 per cent, of its revenue; and therefore call on the Government to legislate for what Milton Friedman described as the least bad tax and begin to impose a land value tax on landholdings above 1,000 acres, initially to replace business rates and ultimately in order to tax wealth and unearned income so as to reduce the taxation of productive work through income tax and VAT.’

Amendment (l)

Ed Davey

Daisy Cooper

Wendy Chamberlain

Mr Alistair Carmichael

Tim Farron

Layla Moran

Christine JardineWera HobhouseJamie StoneSarah OlneyMunira WilsonSarah GreenHelen MorganLloyd Russell-MoyleStephen Farry

At end add ‘but respectfully regret that the Gracious Speech does not tackle the pressing issues facing communities up and down the country, fails to implement a windfall tax on oil and gas super profits and to introduce measures that would protect rural areas, such as preventing water companies from pumping sewage into rivers, waterways, and oceans; and further regret that the provisions of the Gracious Speech fail to protect households from the rising cost of heating oil, which is not capped, and to protect farmers who are being undercut by new trade deals, neglect to tackle recruitment in agriculture and fail to uphold animal welfare and environmental standards, do nothing to stop the proliferation of second homes and holiday cottages in rural communities, which results in a shortage of affordable homes, or to tackle the chronic shortage of dentists and GPs which results in patients facing long waits for essential treatment, and fail to address the growing waiting times for ambulances in rural areas and do nothing to reverse the closures of critical ambulance stations where these closures worsen ambulance waiting times.’

Amendment (m)

Ed Davey

Daisy Cooper

Wendy Chamberlain

Mr Alistair Carmichael

Tim Farron

Layla Moran

Christine JardineWera HobhouseJamie StoneSarah OlneyMunira WilsonSarah GreenHelen MorganLloyd Russell-MoyleStephen Farry

At end add ‘but respectfully regret that the Gracious Speech fails to support unpaid carers despite a Bill having been prepared, fails to tackle issues in SEND education provision and does nothing to ensure pupils affected by the pandemic get extra support to catch up missed education, is not sufficiently ambitious in tackling the cost of living crisis and should include provision for an emergency tax cut cutting the top rate of VAT from 20 per cent to 17.5 per cent; further regret that the Gracious Speech fails to tackle violence against women and girls, nor does it tackle fraud and scams, does nothing to provide safe and legal routes to sanctuary for refugees fleeing war and persecution, does nothing to tackle the chronic shortage of dentists and GPs which results in long waiting times for patients requiring essential treatment, ignores the growing waiting times for ambulances, does not reverse the misguided cut to the armed forces of up to 10,000 troops, and fails to restore with immediate effect the 0.7 per cent target of GNI for international development spending.’

Amendment (n)

Tim Farron

Caroline Lucas

Sir George Howarth

Claire Hanna

Colum Eastwood

Jim Shannon

Ian PaisleyGavin RobinsonGrahame MorrisCat SmithKate HollernMarsha De CordovaKim JohnsonNeale HanveyStephen FarryStephen TimmsDr Lisa CameronEd DaveyDaisy CooperWendy ChamberlainMr Alistair CarmichaelLayla MoranChristine JardineWera HobhouseJamie StoneSarah OlneyMunira WilsonSarah GreenHelen Morgan

At end add ‘but, while welcoming the mental health bill brought forward in the Gracious Speech and the forthcoming scrutiny of its contents, respectfully regret that it did not include a strategy for reducing cancer waiting times as committed by the Government; are concerned by the continued downward trajectory of cancer waiting times since 2017; note that NHS operational standards requiring at least 85 per cent of cancer patients to be seen within 62 days have not been met for over five years; note the commitment to reach an average figure of 80 per cent of patients seen within 62 days by March 2023; and respectfully ask the Government to publish a strategy for how that target will be met.’

Amendment (o)

Margaret Greenwood

Jeremy Corbyn

Tony Lloyd

Rebecca Long Bailey

Ms Marie Rimmer

Ian Byrne

Apsana BegumClaudia WebbeKate HollernGrahame MorrisMick WhitleyNadia WhittomeRichard BurgonKim JohnsonHelen MorganZarah SultanaBarry GardinerRosie Cooper

At end add ‘but respectfully regret that the Gracious Speech does not contain measures to deal with the crisis in adult literacy; note that the National Literacy Trust estimates that there are more than 7 million adults in England who have very poor literacy skills; recognise that people who struggle to read and write can face great hardship in life, for example through experiencing difficulty in undertaking a wide range of practical activities such as securing housing, dealing with utility companies, managing financial affairs and finding well paid employment; further note that they may be more vulnerable to exploitation by scammers and less able to access support and that their opportunity to express themselves and reach their full potential can be seriously curtailed; believe that it is in the interest of the UK economy to address this crisis; and call on the Government to bring forward legislative proposals requiring the Secretary of State for Education to, every two years, review levels of adult literacy in England, publish the findings of those reviews and set out a strategy to improve levels of adult literacy in England.’

Amendment (p)

Margaret Greenwood

Jeremy Corbyn

Tony Lloyd

Rebecca Long Bailey

Ms Marie Rimmer

Ian Byrne

Apsana BegumClaudia WebbeKate HollernGrahame MorrisMick WhitleyNadia WhittomeRichard BurgonKim JohnsonZarah SultanaBarry GardinerRosie Cooper

At end add ‘but respectfully regret that the Gracious Speech does not contain measures to ensure that people in England will be able to receive treatment at any A&E department they present at; note concerning reports about a woman being turned away from A&E because of the area in which she lived due to a protocol; further note with concern that this sets a precedent; believe that there should be no circumstances in which someone is turned away from A&E because they present at one that is not in their local area; further believe that people need to feel confident that, if they have an accident while they are away from home, they will be able to receive treatment at the nearest A&E; express regret that the Government did not accept an amendment to the previous session’s Health and Care Bill designed to ensure that any provider of health services could not withhold provision of services from any individual because of the Integrated Care Board to which they are allocated; remain extremely concerned that, because of this, there may be more cases whereby people are denied the emergency treatment that they need if they happen to be outside the area where they live when they seek treatment; and call on the Government to bring forward legislative proposals to ensure that people in England will be able to receive treatment at any A&E department they present at.’

Amendment (q)

Margaret Greenwood

Jeremy Corbyn

Tony Lloyd

Rebecca Long Bailey

Ms Marie Rimmer

Ian Byrne

Apsana BegumClaudia WebbeKate HollernGrahame MorrisMick WhitleyNadia WhittomeRichard BurgonKim JohnsonZarah SultanaBarry GardinerRosie Cooper

At end add ‘but respectfully regret that the Gracious Speech does not contain measures to ensure that the new NHS payment scheme, provided for in the Health and Care Act 2022, will not lead to an erosion of the scope of Agenda for Change; note that NHS England will be required to consult with each relevant provider, including private providers, before publishing the NHS payment scheme; are concerned that this will be a mechanism by which the Government will give private health companies the opportunity to undercut the NHS and that this may lead to an increase in the amount of healthcare that is currently provided by the NHS being delivered by the private sector; are further concerned about the impact of this on NHS staff who could potentially find themselves forced out of jobs that are currently on Agenda for Change rates of pay, pensions and other terms and conditions, with only private sector jobs with potentially lesser pay and conditions available for them to apply for if they wish to continue working in the health service; and call on the Government to bring forward legislation to ensure that the pay rates of Agenda for Change, pensions, and other terms and conditions of all eligible NHS staff are not undermined as a result of the NHS payment scheme.’

Amendment (r)

Margaret Greenwood

Caroline Lucas

Jeremy Corbyn

Tony Lloyd

Rebecca Long Bailey

Ms Marie Rimmer

Ian ByrneApsana BegumClaudia WebbeKate HollernGrahame MorrisMick WhitleyNadia WhittomeRichard BurgonKim JohnsonZarah SultanaBarry GardinerRosie Cooper

At end add ‘but respectfully regret that the Gracious Speech does not contain measures to ban fracking and Underground Coal Gasification (UCG); recognise that fracking and UCG are strongly opposed by local communities and are detrimental to the environment and the fight against climate change; note that in May 2019, the Government announced a pause on fracking activity in England after a report by the Oil and Gas Authority found it was not possible to accurately predict the probability or magnitude of earthquakes linked to hydraulic fracturing operations; note with concern that the Government recently commissioned the British Geological Survey to advise on the latest scientific evidence around shale gas extraction; fear that this is the first step towards the Government allowing fracking to begin in the UK; and call on the Government to bring forward legislation to ban fracking and UCG once and for all.’

Amendment (s)

Ian Blackford

Kirsten Oswald

Stuart C McDonald

Kirsty Blackman

Carol Monaghan

Owen Thompson

Pete WishartStewart HosieAngus Brendan MacNeilHannah BardellMhairi BlackSteven BonnarDeidre BrockAlan BrownAmy CallaghanDr Lisa CameronDouglas ChapmanJoanna CherryRonnie CowanAngela CrawleyMartyn DayMartin Docherty-HughesDave DooganAllan DoransMarion FellowsStephen FlynnPatricia GibsonPatrick GradyPeter GrantDrew HendryChris LawDavid LindenStewart Malcolm McDonaldAnne McLaughlinJohn McNallyGavin NewlandsJohn NicolsonBrendan O’HaraMs Anum QaisarTommy SheppardAlyn SmithChris StephensAlison ThewlissRichard ThomsonDr Philippa WhitfordLiz Saville RobertsJonathan Edwards

At end add ‘but respectfully regret that the Gracious Speech fails to include bills that protect workers’ rights, tackle the cost of living crisis, or the climate emergency; further regret that the Gracious Speech does not contain provision to uplift benefits and implement a windfall tax on companies which are benefiting from significantly increased profits as a result of impacts associated with the pandemic or the current international situation; and reject the proposals both for a Brexit Freedoms Bill, which will undermine devolution, and the Bill of Rights, which will weaken human rights protections.’

Amendment (t)

Nadia Whittome

Wera Hobhouse

David Linden

Mr Virendra Sharma

Lloyd Russell-Moyle

Mary Kelly Foy

Kim JohnsonApsana BegumBell Ribeiro-AddyRichard BurgonCharlotte NicholsBeth WinterCaroline LucasEd DaveyJohn McDonnellKim LeadbeaterClive LewisClaudia WebbeZarah Sultana

At end add ‘but respectfully regret that the Gracious Speech does not make clear that legislation to ban conversion therapy will apply to all; note the Government’s intention to ban the abhorrent practices of conversion therapy and that the Government’s National LGBT Survey found that trans people were twice as likely to be subjected to and offered conversion therapy than LGB people; and call on the Government to ensure that the proposed legislation on banning conversion therapy covers both sexual orientation and gender identity, and to ban the practice in all circumstances.’

Amendment (u)

Kim Johnson

John McDonnell

Jeremy Corbyn

Bell Ribeiro-Addy

Mick Whitley

Ian Lavery

Zarah SultanaRichard BurgonGrahame MorrisAndy McDonaldTahir AliIan MearnsRebecca Long BaileyApsana BegumClaudia WebbeClive LewisDawn ButlerNadia Whittome

At end add ‘but respectfully regret that the Gracious Speech fails to include measures to address skyrocketing child poverty, which is the main determinant of inequalities in educational attainment and a key barrier to effective education; note that the equivalent of nine children in every class of 30 are living in poverty; further note that the number of households with children not on Free School Meals who are now worried their children will have to go without lunch some days has quadrupled in the last two years; and that nearly four million children are now living in poverty, with a record-breaking two-thirds of these living in working families; and therefore call on the Government to raise the minimum wage to £15 per hour, reinstate and extend the £20 uplift to Universal Credit to all benefits, expand the Free School Meal scheme to include every child up to the age of 16 from a household in receipt of Universal Credit or equivalent benefits, eradicate holiday hunger by extending Free School Meal provision during all school holidays, ease the cost of living crisis by implementing universal free school meals for all primary children as in Wales, increase school funding to at least levels seen in 2009, and increase funding for early intervention and prevention initiatives.’

Amendment (w)

Keir Starmer

Angela Rayner

Rachel Reeves

Jonathan Reynolds

Thangam Debbonaire

Sir Alan Campbell

At end add ‘but respectfully regret that the Gracious Speech fails to bring forward immediately an emergency budget to tackle the cost of living crisis or to set out a new approach to the economy that will end 12 years of slow growth and high taxation under successive Conservative Governments.’

Amendment (x)

Rachael Maskell

At end add ‘but, while recognising the legislative proposals on housing reform brought forward in the Gracious Speech and the forthcoming scrutiny of those proposals, respectfully regret that it did not include a strategy to address the expansion and regulation of holiday homes and Airbnbs in local communities; are concerned that the scale of homes being converted into holiday lets and Airbnbs in high tourism areas is having a significant and adverse impact on the availability and affordability of homes for local people; note the ONS survey in 2021 found young and low paid workers in tourist hotspots are increasingly facing the prospect of being priced out of local housing markets; note that the high concentration of holiday homes and Airbnbs in some communities threatens the viability of local services, undermines community cohesion, reduces the number of properties available on the market and often increases anti-social behaviour; further note that in the devolved regions measures are already being put in place to address these issues; and respectfully ask the Government to publish a strategy for how it will license short-term holiday lets and ensure that local authorities have the necessary powers to prevent the use of residential dwellings for short-term holiday lets, and to apply sanctions on those that disrupt local communities.’

2. Income Tax

No debate (Standing Order No. 118(6))

John Glen

That the draft Alternative Finance (Income Tax, Capital Gains Tax and Corporation Tax) Order 2022, which was laid before this House on 28 March in the last session of Parliament, be approved.

Notes:

If this item is opposed after 7.00pm, the division will be deferred.

PRESENTATION OF PUBLIC PETITIONS

No debate or decision (Standing Order No. 153)

Doncaster bid for Great British Railways headquarters: Nick Fletcher

Carnforth bid for Great British Railways headquarters: David Morris

ADJOURNMENT DEBATE

Until 7.30pm or for half an hour (whichever is later) (Standing Order No. 9(7))

Contribution of UK songwriters and composers to culture and the economy: Kevin Brennan

Written Statements

STATEMENTS TO BE MADE TODAY

Secretary of State for Defence

1.The Defence and Security Industrial Strategy: Update

Secretary of State for the Home Department

2.Fire Reform White Paper and improving Fire Safety for the public

Notes:

Texts of Written Statements are available from the Vote Office and on the internet at https://questions-statements.parliament.uk/ .

Committees Meeting Today

Broadcasts of proceedings can be found at https://www.parliamentlive.tv/Commons

Some committee members and witnesses might now physically attend meetings, however, there is no public access at present.

Select Committees

Northern Ireland Affairs Committee

Subject: The effect of paramilitaries on society in Northern Ireland

Witnesses: 9.30am: Dr Colm Walsh, Research Fellow, School of Social Sciences, Education and Social Work, and Dr Siobhán McAlister, Senior Lecturer in Criminology, School of Sciences, Education and Social Work, Queen's University Belfast; Prof Duncan Morrow, Professor in Politics and Director of Community Engagement, Ulster University

Room 6
9.00am (private), 9.30am (public)

Work and Pensions Committee

Subject: Universal Credit and Managed Migration

Witnesses: 9.30am: Dominic Milne, Parliamentary Co-Chair Legal Rights Officer, Royal National Institute of Blind People (RNIB); Rebecca Rennison, Principal Policy Manager for welfare policy, Citizens Advice; Fran Bennett, Associate Fellow, Dept of Social Policy and Intervention, University of Oxford and policy adviser, Women's Budget Group; Sophie Corlett, Director of External Relations, MIND

Room 15
9.00am (private), 9.30am (public)

Science and Technology Committee

Subject: Diversity and inclusion in STEM

Witnesses: 9.30am: Dr Claire Crawford, Research Fellow, Institute for Fiscal Studies; Professor Dame Athene Donald, Master of Churchill College and Professor Emerita of Experimental Physics, University of Cambridge; Dr Jasper Green, Her Majesty's Inspector, Schools and Subject Lead, Science, Ofsted Curriculum Unit

10.15am: Clare Hayes, Deputy Head, Hyndland Secondary School; Jane Lunnon, Head, Alleyn's School; Mark Turner, Headteacher, Skipton High School for Girls

11.00am: Rachel Youngman, Deputy Chief Executive, Institute of Physics; Professor Ulrike Tillmann, President, London Mathematical Society

The Grimond Room, Portcullis House
9.20am (private), 9.30am (public)

Home Affairs Committee

Subject: Drugs

Witnesses: 10.00am: Professor Ornella Corazza, Professor of Addiction Science, Hertfordshire University; Professor Jo Neill, Professor of Psychopharmacology, Manchester Pharmacy School, Manchester University; Professor David Nutt, Professor of Neuropsychopharmacology, Imperial College, London; Professor Stuart Reece, Associate Professor of Medicine, University of Western Australia

11.00am: Dr Owen Bowden-Jones, Chair, Dr Emily Finch, Co-chair of the Recovery Committee, and Professor Roger Knaggs, Chair of the Technical Committee, Advisory Council on the Misuse of Drugs

Room 8
9.30am (private), 10.00am (public)

International Trade Committee

Subject: UK trade negotiations: Agreement with New Zealand

Witnesses: 10.00am: Professor Andrew Lang, Chair in International Law and Global Governance, The University of Edinburgh; Lucy Monks, Head of International Affairs, Federation of Small Businesses; Catherine Brims, International Policy Adviser, The Law Society; Chris Southworth, Secretary General, International Chamber of Commerce, United Kingdom

11.00am: David Henig, UK Director, European Centre for International Political Economy; Tim Hiscock, British Exporters’ Association, Export Development & International Trade Advisor, Strong and Herd LLP; Jack Semple, Alliance Secretary, Engineering and Machinery Alliance

The Macmillan Room, Portcullis House
9.30am (private), 10.00am (public)

Transport Committee

Subject: National bus strategy: one year on

Witnesses: 9.30am: Councillor Tony Page, Deputy Leader, Reading Borough Council; Councillor Steven Broadbent, Cabinet Member for Transport, Buckinghamshire Council; Peter Bond, Director of Integrated Network Services, Transport for the West Midlands

10.30am: Peter Hardy, Technical Director, Integrated Transport Planning; Councillor David Renard, Chair of the Environment, Economy, Housing and Transport Board, Local Government Association; Linda McCord, Senior Stakeholder Manager, Transport Focus

Room 16
9.30am (public)

Welsh Affairs Committee

Subject: Grid capacity in Wales

Witness: 11.00am: Julie James MS, Minister for Climate Change, Welsh Government

Room 5
10.00am (private), 11.00am (public)

Public Accounts Committee

Subject: Government’s contracts with Randox Laboratories Ltd

Witnesses: 1.30pm: Shona Dunn, Second Permanent Secretary, Department of Health and Social Care; Dame Dr Jenny Harries, Chief Executive, UK Health Security Agency

The Wilson Room, Portcullis House
1.00pm (private), 1.30pm (public)

European Scrutiny Committee

Subject: Retained EU Law: Where next?

Witnesses: 2.30pm: Professor Jo Hunt, Professor in Law, Cardiff University School of Law and Politics; Professor Adelyn Wilson, Dean for International Stakeholder Engagement, and Dr Robert Taylor, Senior Lecturer in UK Public Law, Aberdeen University; Professor Christopher McCrudden, Professor of Human Rights and Equality Law, School of Law, Queen's University Belfast

Room 5
1.45pm (private), 2.30pm (public)

Environmental Audit Committee

Subject: Net zero aviation and shipping

Witnesses: 2.15pm: Emma Gilthorpe, CEO, Jet Zero Council; Sophie Lane, Chief Relationships Officer, Aerospace Technology Institute

3.15pm: Robert Courts MP, Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Eamonn Beirne, Deputy Director: Maritime Environment, Technology and International, and Holly Greig, Deputy Director: Aviation Decarbonisation Division, Department for Transport; Lee Rowley MP, Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State (Minister for Industry), and Paul Griffiths, Head of Aerospace Team, Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy

Room 6
2.00pm (private), 2.15pm (public)

Health and Social Care Committee

Subject: The future of General Practice

Witnesses: 2.15pm: Dr Pauline Grant, General Practitioner, Cheviot Road Surgery; Dr Jacob Lee, General Practitioner, Horfield Health Centre

3.00pm: Professor Steinar Hunskår, Professor of Primary Care, University of Bergen; Dr Rebecca Rosen, Senior Fellow, Nuffield Trust; Dr Kate Sidaway-Lee, Research Fellow, St Leonard's Medical Practice

Room 15
2.00pm (private), 2.15pm (public)

International Development Committee

Subject: Future of UK aid

Witnesses: 2.30pm: Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss MP, Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, Sir Philip Barton KCMG OBE, Permanent Under-Secretary, and Nick Dyer, Director General - Humanitarian and Development, Foreign, Commonwealth & Development Office

The Grimond Room, Portcullis House
2.00pm (private), 2.30pm (public)

Women and Equalities Committee

Subject: Racial harassment and discrimination in higher education (one-off session)

Witnesses: 2.30pm: Dr Arun Verma, Head of Race Equality Charter, Advance HE; Larissa Kennedy, President, National Union of Students; Prof David Richardson, Vice Chancellor, University of East Anglia; Prof Nicola Rollock, Professor of Social Policy and Race, King's College London

Room 8
2.00pm (private), 2.30pm (public)

Statutory Instruments

Room 7
2.45pm (private)

Committee of Selection

Room 13
4.30pm (private)

Joint Committees

Human Rights

Subject: Protecting human rights in care settings

Witnesses: 3.00pm: Gillian Keegan MP, Minister of State for Care, Michelle Dyson, Director General for Adult Social Care, and Lyn Romeo, Chief Social Worker for Adults, Department of Health and Social Care

Room 16
2.45pm (private), 3.00pm (public), 4.30pm (private)

Statutory Instruments

Virtual meeting
3.40pm (private)

Delegated Legislation Committees

Second Delegated Legislation Committee

To consider the draft Agriculture and Horticulture Development Board (Amendment) Order 2022

Room 12
2.30pm (public)

Committee Reports Published Today

BUSINESS, ENERGY AND INDUSTRIAL STRATEGY

1st Special Report: Decarbonising heat in homes: Government Response to the Committee’s Seventh Report of 2021-22 HC 208
Time of publication: 00.01am

EDUCATION

1st Report: Not just another brick in the wall: why prisoners need an education to climb the ladder of opportunity HC 56
Time of publication: 00.01am

PARLIAMENTARY WORKS ESTIMATES COMMISSION

1st Report: Parliamentary Works Sponsor Body: Main Supply Estimate 2022–23: Comments from the Parliamentary Works Estimates Commission and the Treasury HC 232
Time of publication: 00.01am

PUBLIC ACCOUNTS

1st Report: BEIS Annual Report and Accounts 20-21 HC 59
Time of publication: 00.01am

Announcements

FORTHCOMING END OF DAY ADJOURNMENT DEBATES

Tuesday 24 May to Thursday 26 May (deadline Wednesday 18 May 7.00pm or the rise of the House, whichever is earlier)

Applications should be made in writing to the Table Office. Members can submit their application via MemberHub, from their own email account or in hard copy. Application forms are available on the Table Office page on the Parliamentary intranet. The ballot will take place on Thursday 19 May.

FORTHCOMING DEPARTMENTS ANSWERING IN WESTMINSTER HALL

Applications for 90, 60 and 30-minute debates should be made to the Table Office by 10.00pm or rise of the House, whichever is the earlier, on the deadline dates listed below. Members can submit their application via MemberHub, from their own email account or in hard copy. Application forms are available on the Table Office page on the Parliamentary intranet.

The ballot takes place on the day following the deadline. Members will be informed of the outcome by the Speaker’s Office.

Tuesday 7 and Wednesday 8 June (deadline Monday 23 May 10.00pm or the rise of the House, whichever is earlier)

The following Departments will answer:

Attorney General; Defence; Digital, Culture, Media and Sport; Education; Health and Social Care; International Trade; Justice; Levelling Up, Housing and Communities; Scotland; Wales

Tuesday 14 and Wednesday 15 June (deadline Monday 6 June 10.00pm or the rise of the House, whichever is earlier)

The following Departments will answer:

Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy; Cabinet Office; Environment, Food and Rural Affairs; Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office; Home Office; Northern Ireland; Transport; Treasury; Women and Equalities; Work and Pensions

Tuesday 21 and Wednesday 22 June (deadline Monday 13 June 10.00pm or the rise of the House, whichever is earlier)

The following Departments will answer:

Attorney General; Defence; Digital, Culture, Media and Sport; Education; Health and Social Care; International Trade; Justice; Levelling Up, Housing and Communities; Scotland; Wales

PRIVATE MEMBERS’ BILLS

Ballot Bills

Event

Date and location

Ballot book entry

Tuesday 17 May and Wednesday 18 May, No Division lobby, from 11.30am until the rise of the House

Ballot draw

Thursday 19 May, 9.00am, Committee Room 15 (also broadcast live)

Presentation of ballot bills

Wednesday 15 June, immediately after questions and statements (if any)

Members may enter only one name into the ballot, either their own or that of another Member who has authorised them to do so, and no name may appear more than once. Neither a Bill nor Bill titles are required at this stage.

On the day of the ballot, the Chairman of Ways and Means will draw twenty names in reverse order. At about 9.30am on that day the list of successful Members will be available in the Vote Office and on the internet. Members successful in the ballot will be contacted by the Clerk of Private Members’ Bills.

First notices of ten minute rule motions and presentation of non-ballot bills

Event

Date and location

First notices of ten minute rule motions

Thursday 16 June, by email from the Member’s parliamentary email address to PBOHoC@parliament.uk, from 10.00am until the rise of the House

First notices of presentation bills (to be presented on or after Monday 20 June)

Thursday 16 June, by email from the Member’s parliamentary email address to PBOHoC@parliament.uk, from 10.00am until the rise of the House

There will be no physical queue for the first notices of ten minute rule motions or presentation bills.

A single notice (of either a ten minute rule motion OR a presentation bill) will be accepted from each Member from emails received from the Member’s parliamentary email address between 10.00 and 10.30am. After 10.30am, unlimited further notices will be accepted from emails received from the Member’s parliamentary email address at or after 10.00am in the order in which they were received.

Four ten minute rule slots will be available (for speeches on 28 June, 29 June, 5 July and 6 July).

Members interested in giving notice on 16 June should contact the Clerk of Private Members’ Bills in advance to agree bill titles (PBOHoC@parliament.uk, x3254).

Notes:

Arrangements made according to Standing Order No.14(10) and (11) and on the authority

of Mr Speaker.

ELECTION OF THE CHAIR OF THE ENVIRONMENT, FOOD AND RURAL AFFAIRS COMMITTEE

Nominations and ballot

Nominations must be received in writing in the Table Office or Public Bill Office by 12 noon on Tuesday 24 May. Nomination forms are available in those offices and in the Vote Office.

In accordance with the House’s decision of 16 January 2020 only members of the Conservative Party may be candidates in this election.

Each nomination shall consist of a signed statement (up to 500 words) made by the candidate declaring their willingness to stand for election, accompanied by the signatures of 15 Members elected to the House as members of the same party as the candidate. Statements may (optionally) be accompanied by signatures of up to five Members elected to the House as members of any party other than that to which the candidate belongs, or members of no party.

No Member may sign more than one such statement; if any Member does so, their signature will be invalidated for all nominations.

If there is more than one candidate, the ballot will take place between 11.00am and 2.30pm on Wednesday 25 May in the Aye division lobby.

As soon as practicable after the votes have been counted the Speaker will announce to the House the results of the ballot.

Members nominated for election as Chair of the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs Committee

Up to and including Tuesday 17 May.

New nominations are marked thus *

Candidate: Dr Neil Hudson*

Nominated by (own party): James Grundy, Scott Benton, Tracey Crouch, Sally-Ann Hart, Henry Smith, Dame Caroline Dinenage, Mr Andrew Mitchell, Kevin Hollinrake, Simon Hoare, Alec Shelbrooke, Simon Fell, Peter Aldous, Kate Griffiths, Dr Luke Evans, Ian Levy

Nominated by (other parties or no party): Alex Davies-Jones, Rosie Duffield, Kirsty Blackman, Ben Lake, Stephen Kinnock

Interests declared: Fellow of the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons (FRVS), Member of the British Equine Veterinary Association, Member of the British Horseracing Authority Whip Review Steering Group (Unpaid), APPG for the Horse (Officer), APPG for Animal Welfare (Vice-Chair)

Candidate: Sir Geoffrey Clifton-Brown*

Nominated by (own party): John Howell, David Morris, Mr Mark Harper, Sir Robert Neill, Sir Christopher Chope, Mr Mark Francois, Mr Jonathan Djanogly, Mr Ian Liddell-Grainger, Mark Pawsey, Tom Tugendhat, Jack Lopresti, Gary Sambrook, Sir Paul Beresford, Mr Laurence Robertson, Sir Robert Syms

Nominated by (other parties or no party): Judith Cummins, Dame Meg Hillier, Carolyn Harris, Mr Clive Betts, Jim Shannon

Interests declared: Farmer and Chartered Surveyor, as registered in the Register of Members’ Financial Interests

Further Information

Members’ Guide to Chamber proceedings

The Members’ Guide to Chamber proceedings is available on the Parliamentary website

Business of the Day

Documents and reports relating to the business being held in the Chamber are available on the Commons Business Briefings webpage: www.parliament.uk/business/publications/research/commons-business-briefings/

Written Statements

Text of today’s Written Statements: https://questions-statements.parliament.uk/

Select Committees

Select Committees Webpage: https://committees.parliament.uk/

Standing Orders Relating to Public Business

Text of Standing Orders relating to public business: https://publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm5802/cmstords/so_804_2021/so-804_02122021.pdf

European Business

European Business Referrals and Motion documents for consideration by European Committees or on the Floor of the House are available on the European Business
webpage: https://old.parliament.uk/business/publications/business-papers/commons/european-business11/

Chamber Engagement

Information about engaging the public with debates is available on the parliamentary website: https://www.parliament.uk/get-involved/have-your-say-on-laws/chamber-engagement/.

All business papers are available via the HousePapers app on mobile devices

Part 2: Future Business

A. CALENDAR OF BUSINESS

Business in either Chamber may be changed, and further business added, up to the rising of the House on the day before it is to be taken, and is therefore provisional.

Government items of business in this section have nominally been set down for
today, but are expected to be taken on the dates stated.

B. REMAINING ORDERS AND NOTICES

Business in this section has not yet been scheduled for a specific date. It has been nominally set down for today but is not expected to be taken today.

A. Calendar of Business

Business in either Chamber may be changed, and further business added, up to the rising of the House on the day before it is to be taken, and is therefore provisional.

THURSDAY 19 MAY

CHAMBER

QUESTIONS

9.30am Questions to the Secretary of State for Transport

10.15am Topical Questions to the Secretary of State for Transport

Afterwards

GENERAL DEBATE ON TRANSPORT

The Prime Minister

That this House has considered transport.

GENERAL DEBATE ON NATO AND INTERNATIONAL SECURITY

The Prime Minister

That this House has considered NATO and international security.

Relevant Documents:

Fifty-Second Report of the Committee of Public Accounts, Session 2021-22, Ministry of Defence Equipment Plan 2021-31, HC 1164

PRESENTATION OF PUBLIC PETITIONS

Waverley Junior Academy: Alexander Stafford

ADJOURNMENT DEBATE

East Suffolk and Wherry railway lines: Peter Aldous

WESTMINSTER HALL

1.30pm That this House has considered reforms to Child Maintenance Service: Marion Fellows

3.15pm That this House has considered dialysis care outcomes: Jim Shannon

Notes:

The subjects for these debates were allocated by the Chairman of Ways and Means.

The sitting will be suspended and time added if divisions take place in the main Chamber (Standing Order No. 10(3)).

MONDAY 23 MAY

CHAMBER

QUESTIONS

2.30pm Questions to the Secretary of State for Education

3.15pm Topical Questions to the Secretary of State for Education

Afterwards

Public Order Bill: Second Reading

ADJOURNMENT DEBATE

Hospitality industry in Liverpool: Dan Carden

WESTMINSTER HALL

4.30pm That this House has considered e-petition 580220, relating to legal recognition of non-binary gender identities: Nick Fletcher, on behalf of the Petitions Committee

Relevant Documents:

Third Report of the Women and Equalities Committee, Session 2020–21, Reform of the Gender Recognition Act, HC 977, and the Government response, HC 129

6.00pm That this House has considered e-petition 599089, relating to taxes on motor fuel: Tonia Antoniazzi, on behalf of the Petitions Committee

Relevant Documents:

Written Evidence: Summary of public engagement by the Petitions Committee on the impact of increases in the cost of motor fuel, reported to the House on 12 May 2022, HC 73

Notes:

The subjects for these debates were determined by the Petitions Committee. The sitting will last for up to three hours. The sitting will be suspended and time added if divisions take place in the main Chamber (Standing Order No. 10(3)).

TUESDAY 24 MAY

CHAMBER

QUESTIONS

11.30am Questions to the Secretary of State for Justice

12.15pm Topical Questions to the Secretary of State for Justice

Afterwards

SECOND READING OF A BILL

WESTMINSTER HALL

9.30am That this House has considered funding levels for diplomatic staff in the Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office: Valerie Vaz

11.00am That this House has considered the potential for a hydrogen village: Justin Madders

Notes:

The sitting will be suspended from 11.30am to 2.30pm.

2.30pm That this House has considered the matter of tackling fly-tipping and illegal dumping: Saqib Bhatti

4.00pm That this House has considered Swindon’s bid to host Great British Railways’ headquarters: Sir Robert Buckland

4.30pm That this House has considered Georgia and the war in Ukraine: Mr Jonathan Djanogly

Notes:

The debate at 4.30pm will last for up to an hour.

The sitting will be suspended and time added if divisions take place in the main Chamber (Standing Order No. 10(3)).

WEDNESDAY 25 MAY

CHAMBER

QUESTIONS

11.30am Questions to the Secretary of State for Wales

12 noon Questions to the Prime Minister

Afterwards

REMAINING STAGES OF THE PRODUCT SECURITY AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS INFRASTRUCTURE BILL

Notes:

Queen’s Consent to be signified on Third Reading.

GENERAL DEBATE ON UKRAINE

The Prime Minister

That this House has considered Ukraine.

WESTMINSTER HALL

9.30am That this House has considered foreign lobbying in the UK: Bob Seely

11.00am That this House has considered the potential merits of a video games enterprise zone in Stoke-on-Trent: Jonathan Gullis

Notes:

The sitting will be suspended from 11.30am to 2.30pm.

2.30pm That this House has considered the fiscal approach to tackling rises in the cost of living: Dan Jarvis

4.00pm That this House has considered the impact of India’s foreign contribution law on NGOs: Stephen Timms

4.30pm That this House has considered recruitment support for the agriculture sector: Wendy Chamberlain

Notes:

The debate at 4.30pm will last for up to an hour.

The sitting will be suspended and time added if divisions take place in the main Chamber (Standing Order No. 10(3)).

THURSDAY 26 MAY

CHAMBER

QUESTIONS

9.30am Questions to the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport

10.00am Topical Questions to the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport

10.10am Questions to the Attorney General

Afterwards

AN HUMBLE ADDRESS TO CELEBRATE THE PLATINUM JUBILEE OF HER MAJESTY THE QUEEN

The Prime Minister

MONDAY 6 JUNE

CHAMBER

QUESTIONS

2.30pm Questions to the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions

3.15pm Topical Questions to the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions

WESTMINSTER HALL

4.30pm That this House has considered e-petition 603988, relating to breed specific legislation: Christina Rees, on behalf of the Petitions Committee

Notes:

The subject for this debate was determined by the Petitions Committee. The sitting will last for up to three hours. The sitting will be suspended and time added if divisions take place in the main Chamber (Standing Order No. 10(3)).

TUESDAY 7 JUNE

CHAMBER

QUESTIONS

11.30am Questions to the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy

12.15pm Topical Questions to the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy

WEDNESDAY 8 JUNE

CHAMBER

QUESTIONS

11.30am Questions to the Minister for Women and Equalities

11.53am Topical Questions to the Minister for Women and Equalities

12 noon Questions to the Prime Minister

THURSDAY 9 JUNE

CHAMBER

QUESTIONS

9.30am Questions to the Minister for the Cabinet Office

10.15am Topical Questions to the Minister for the Cabinet Office

MONDAY 13 JUNE

CHAMBER

QUESTIONS

2.30pm Questions to the Secretary of State for Defence

3.15pm Topical Questions to the Secretary of State for Defence

TUESDAY 14 JUNE

CHAMBER

QUESTIONS

11.30am Questions to the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care

12.15pm Topical Questions to the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care

WEDNESDAY 15 JUNE

CHAMBER

QUESTIONS

11.30am Questions to the President of COP26

11.53am Topical Questions to the President of COP26

12 noon Questions to the Prime Minister

THURSDAY 16 JUNE

CHAMBER

QUESTIONS

9.30am Questions to the Secretary of State for International Trade

10.15am Topical Questions to the Secretary of State for International Trade

MONDAY 20 JUNE

CHAMBER

QUESTIONS

2.30pm Questions to the Secretary of State for the Home Department

3.15pm Topical Questions to the Secretary of State for the Home Department

WESTMINSTER HALL

4.30pm That this House has considered e-petition 613556, relating to transgender conversion therapy: Elliot Colburn, on behalf of the Petitions Committee

Notes:

The subject for this debate was determined by the Petitions Committee. The sitting will last for up to three hours. The sitting will be suspended and time added if divisions take place in the main Chamber (Standing Order No. 10(3)).

TUESDAY 21 JUNE

CHAMBER

QUESTIONS

11.30am Questions to the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs

12.15pm Topical Questions to the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs

WEDNESDAY 22 JUNE

CHAMBER

QUESTIONS

11.30am Questions to the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland

12 noon Questions to the Prime Minister

THURSDAY 23 JUNE

CHAMBER

QUESTIONS

9.30am Questions to the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs

10.00am Topical Questions to the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs

10.10am Questions to Church Commissioners, House of Commons Commission, Parliamentary Works Sponsor Body, Public Accounts Commission and Speaker’s Committee on the Electoral Commission

MONDAY 27 JUNE

CHAMBER

QUESTIONS

2.30pm Questions to the Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities

3.15pm Topical Questions to the Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities

TUESDAY 28 JUNE

CHAMBER

QUESTIONS

11.30am Questions to the Chancellor of the Exchequer

12.15pm Topical Questions to the Chancellor of the Exchequer

WEDNESDAY 29 JUNE

CHAMBER

QUESTIONS

11.30am Questions to the Secretary of State for Scotland

12 noon Questions to the Prime Minister

THURSDAY 30 JUNE

CHAMBER

QUESTIONS

9.30am Questions to the Secretary of State for Transport

10.15am Topical Questions to the Secretary of State for Transport

MONDAY 4 JULY

CHAMBER

QUESTIONS

2.30pm Questions to the Secretary of State for Education

3.15pm Topical Questions to the Secretary of State for Education

TUESDAY 5 JULY

CHAMBER

QUESTIONS

11.30am Questions to the Secretary of State for Justice

12.15pm Topical Questions to the Secretary of State for Justice

WEDNESDAY 6 JULY

CHAMBER

QUESTIONS

11.30am Questions to the Secretary of State for Wales

12 noon Questions to the Prime Minister

THURSDAY 7 JULY

CHAMBER

QUESTIONS

9.30am Questions to the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport

10.00am Topical Questions to the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport

10.10am Questions to the Attorney General

MONDAY 11 JULY

CHAMBER

QUESTIONS

2.30pm Questions to the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions

3.15pm Topical Questions to the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions

TUESDAY 12 JULY

CHAMBER

QUESTIONS

11.30am Questions to the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy

12.15pm Topical Questions to the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy

WEDNESDAY 13 JULY

CHAMBER

QUESTIONS

11.30am Questions to the Minister for Women and Equalities

11.53am Topical Questions to the Minister for Women and Equalities

12 noon Questions to the Prime Minister

THURSDAY 14 JULY

CHAMBER

QUESTIONS

9.30am Questions to the Minister for the Cabinet Office

10.15am Topical Questions to the Minister for the Cabinet Office

B. Remaining Orders and Notices

Business in this section has not yet been scheduled for a specific date. It has therefore been set down formally to be taken in the Chamber today but is not expected to be taken today.

1. Passports

Secretary Priti Patel

That the draft Passport (Fees) Regulations 2022, which were laid before this House on 25 April in the last session of Parliament, be approved.

2. Electricity

Secretary Kwasi Kwarteng

That the draft Contracts for Difference (Miscellaneous Amendments) Regulations 2022, which were laid before this House on 31 March in the last session of Parliament, be approved.

Notes:

The instrument has not yet been considered by the Joint Committee on Statutory Instruments.

3. Electronic Information

Secretary Kwasi Kwarteng

That the draft Internal Markets Information System Regulation (Amendment etc.) Regulations 2021, which were laid before this House on 20 July 2021 in the last session of Parliament, be approved.

4. Environmental Protection

Secretary Kwasi Kwarteng

That the draft Pollution Prevention and Control (Fees) (Miscellaneous Amendments) Regulations 2022, which were laid before this House on 25 April in the last session of Parliament, be approved.

5. Sanctions

Secretary Elizabeth Truss

That the Russia (Sanctions) (EU Exit) (Amendment) (No. 9) Regulations 2022 (SI, 2022, No. 477), a copy of which was laid before this House on 27 April in the last session of Parliament, be approved.

Notes

The instrument has not yet been considered by the Joint Committee on Statutory Instruments.

6. Medicines

Maria Caulfield

That the draft Pharmacy (Preparation and Dispensing Errors - Hospital and Other Pharmacy Services) Order 2022, which was laid before this House on 28 April in the last session of Parliament, be approved.

Notes

The instrument has not yet been considered by the Joint Committee on Statutory Instruments.

7. Medicines

Maria Caulfield

That the draft Pharmacy (Responsible Pharmacists, Superintendent Pharmacists etc.) Order 2022, which was laid before this House on 28 April in the last session of Parliament, be approved.

Notes

The instrument has not yet been considered by the Joint Committee on Statutory Instruments.

8. Exiting the European Union (Customs)

Secretary George Eustice

That the draft International Waste Shipments (Amendment) (EU Exit) Regulations 2021, which were laid before this House on 17 December 2020 in a previous session of Parliament, be approved.

9. Agriculture

Secretary George Eustice

That the draft Import of Animals and Animal Products and Approved Countries (Amendment) Regulations 2022, which were laid before this House on 30 March in the last session of Parliament, be approved.

Notes

The instrument has not yet been considered by the Joint Committee on Statutory Instruments.

10. Agriculture

Secretary George Eustice

That the draft Agriculture and Horticulture Development Board (Amendment) Order 2022, which was laid before this House on 29 March in the last session of Parliament, be approved.

Notes

The instrument has not yet been considered by the Joint Committee on Statutory Instruments.

11. Agriculture

Secretary George Eustice

That the draft Common Agricultural Policy (Cross-Compliance Exemptions and Transitional Regulation) (Amendment) (EU Exit) Regulations 2022, which were laid before this House on 11 May, be approved.

Notes

The instrument has not yet been considered by the Joint Committee on Statutory Instruments.

12. Construction

Secretary Kwasi Kwarteng

That the draft Construction Contracts (England) Exclusion Order 2022, which was laid before this House on 11 May, be approved.

Notes

The instrument has not yet been considered by the Joint Committee on Statutory Instruments.

13. Electricity

Secretary Kwasi Kwarteng

That the draft Contracts for Difference (Allocation) and Electricity Market Reform (General) (Amendment) Regulations 2022, which were laid before this House on 11 May, be approved.

Notes

The instrument has not yet been considered by the Joint Committee on Statutory Instruments.

14. High Speed Rail (Crewe - Manchester) Bill: Second Reading

Notes

Queen’s and Prince of Wales’ consent to be signified on Third Reading.

15. Levelling-up and Regeneration Bill: Second Reading

Notes

Queen’s and Prince of Wales’ consent to be signified on Third Reading.

16. Levelling-up and Regeneration Bill: Ways and Means

Lucy Frazer

That, for the purposes of any Act resulting from the Levelling-up and Regeneration Bill, it is expedient to authorise:

(1)the charging of fees or other charges;

(2)the imposition of an Infrastructure Levy; and

(3)the payment of sums into the National Loans Fund or the Consolidated Fund.

17. Levelling-up and Regeneration Bill: Money

Lucy Frazer

That, for the purposes of any Act resulting from the Levelling-up and Regeneration Bill, it is expedient to authorise:

(1)the payment out of money provided by Parliament of any expenditure incurred under or by virtue of the Act by a Minister of the Crown or another public authority; and

(2)the payment out of the National Loans Fund, the Consolidated Fund or money provided by Parliament of any increase attributable to the Act in the sums payable under any other Act out of the National Loans Fund, the Consolidated Fund or money so provided.

Notes:

Queen’s Recommendation signified.

18. National Security Bill: Second Reading

19. National Security Bill: Money

Lucy Frazer

That, for the purposes of any Act resulting from the National Security Bill, it is expedient to authorise:

(1)the payment out of money provided by Parliament of:

(a) any expenditure incurred under or by virtue of the Act by a Minister of the Crown; and

(b) any increase attributable to the Act in the sums payable under any other Act out of money so provided; and

(2)the payment of sums into the Consolidated Fund.

Notes:

Queen’s Recommendation signified.

20. Road Traffic

Secretary Grant Shapps

That the draft Goods Vehicles (Licensing of Operators) (Amendment) (No. 2) Regulations 2022, which were laid before this House on 11 May, be approved.

Notes

The instrument has not yet been considered by the Joint Committee on Statutory Instruments.

21. Trade (Australia and New Zealand) Bill: Second Reading

22. Road Traffic

Secretary Grant Shapps

That the draft Motor Vehicles (International Circulation) (Amendment) Order 2022, which was laid before this House on 11 May, be approved.

Notes

The instrument has not yet been considered by the Joint Committee on Statutory Instruments.

23. National Health Service

Edward Argar

That the draft National Health Service (Integrated Care Boards: Exceptions to Core Responsibility) Regulations 2022, which were laid before this House on 11 May, be approved.

Notes

The instrument has not yet been considered by the Joint Committee on Statutory Instruments.

24. Prevention and Suppression of Terrorism

Secretary Priti Patel

That the draft Police, Crime, Sentencing and Courts Act 2022 (Consequential Provision) Regulations 2022, which were laid before this House on 11 May, be approved.

Notes

The instrument has not yet been considered by the Joint Committee on Statutory Instruments.

25. Energy

Kemi Badenoch

That the draft Smoke and Carbon Monoxide Alarm (Amendment) Regulations 2022, which were laid before this House on 11 May, be approved.

Notes

The instrument has not yet been considered by the Joint Committee on Statutory Instruments.

26. Prevention and Suppression of Terrorism

Secretary Priti Patel

That the draft Terrorism Act 2000 (Code of Practice for Examining Officers and Review Officers) Order 2022, which was laid before this House on 11 May, be approved.

Notes

The instrument has not yet been considered by the Joint Committee on Statutory Instruments.

27. Higher Education (Freedom of Speech) Bill: Remaining Stages

Notes:

For amendments, see separate paper (also available on the documents webpage for the Bill). Proceedings on Consideration shall (so far as not previously concluded) be brought to a conclusion one hour before the moment of interruption on the day on which proceedings on Consideration are commenced. Proceedings on Third Reading shall (so far as not previously concluded) be brought to a conclusion at the moment of interruption on that day (Order of 12 July 2021)

28. Animal Welfare (Kept Animals) Bill: Remaining Stages

Notes:

For amendments, see separate paper (also available on the documents webpage for the Bill). Queen’s consent to be signified on Third Reading. Proceedings on Consideration shall (so far as not previously concluded) be brought to a conclusion one hour before the moment of interruption on the day on which those proceedings are commenced. Proceedings on Third Reading shall (so far as not previously concluded) be brought to a conclusion at the moment of interruption on that day. (Order of 25 October 2021).

The Scottish Parliament has approved a Legislative Consent Resolution relating to this Bill. Copies of the Resolution are available in the Vote Office (also available on the documents webpage for the Bill).

29. Regulatory Reform

Secretary Grant Shapps

That the draft Legislative Reform (Provision of Information etc. Relating to Disabilities) Order 2022, which was laid before this House on 12 May, be approved.

Notes:

A 40-day period must elapse before the motion to approve this draft order can be moved in the House.

30. Hovercraft

Secretary Grant Shapps

That the draft Hovercraft (Application of Enactments) and Merchant Shipping (Prevention of Pollution) (Law of the Sea Convention) Amendment Order 2022, which was laid before this House on 12 May, be approved.

Notes:

The instrument has not yet been considered by the Joint Committee on Statutory Instruments.

31. Electricity

Secretary Kwasi Kwarteng

That the draft Warm Home Discount (England and Wales) Regulations 2022, which were laid before this House on 12 May, be approved.

Notes:

The instrument has not yet been considered by the Joint Committee on Statutory Instruments.

32. Public Procurement

Mr Jacob Rees-Mogg

That the draft Public Procurement (International Trade Agreements) (Amendment) Regulations 2022, which were laid before this House on 25 April in the last session of Parliament, be approved.

Notes:

The instrument has not yet been considered by the Joint Committee on Statutory Instruments.

33. Northern Ireland Troubles (Legacy and Reconciliation) Bill: Second Reading

34. Northern Ireland Troubles (Legacy and Reconciliation) Bill: Money

Lucy Frazer

That, for the purposes of any Act resulting from the Northern Ireland Troubles (Legacy and Reconciliation) Bill, it is expedient to authorise:

(1)the payment out of money provided by Parliament of:

(a) any expenditure incurred under or by virtue of the Act by the Secretary of State or any other public authority, and

(b) any increase attributable to the Act in the sums payable under any other Act out of money so provided, and

(2)the payment of sums into the Consolidated Fund.

Notes:

Queen’s Recommendation signified.