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Early Day Motions

Published: Friday 18 November 2022

Early Day Motions tabled on Thursday 17 November 2022

Early Day Motions (EDMs) are motions for which no days have been fixed.

The number of signatories includes all members who have added their names in support of the Early Day Motion (EDM), including the Member in charge of the Motion.

EDMs and added names are also published on the EDM database at www.parliament.uk/edm

[R] Indicates that a relevant interest has been declared.

New EDMs

593Co-Op Funeral Care and Unite Members Industrial Action

Tabled: 17/11/22 Signatories: 2

Chris Stephens

Grahame Morris [R]

That this House shows solidarity with Unite members working at Co-Op Funeral Care in Glasgow who are currently taking industrial action over pay; understands the context of the cost of living crisis with rising food costs, energy bills and inflation at a 41 year high; notes that the Retail Price Index is at its highest level since 1980; further notes that this means RPI is currently over 10% higher than the Co-Op Funeral Care’s latest 4% pay offer; is alarmed by the absence of planned talks with the employer, Co-Op Funeral Care; is disappointed to see this behaviour in a workplace that carries the Co-Op brand name; is surprised to see an organisation, like the Co-Op, whose values are linked to democracy, equality and caring for others, treating workers in such a way that has left them feeling forced to take industrial action; expresses concern that this dispute will continue risking significant coffin supply disruption at a time when seasonal mortality rates are highest; and urges Co-Op Funeral Care to get back round the table to engage in meaningful negotiations.

Added Names

Below are EDMs tabled in the last two weeks to which names have been added. Only the first 6 names and any new names are included.

534Royal Mail industrial dispute and the universal service obligation

Tabled: 3/11/22 Signatories: 53

Ian Lavery

Jon Trickett

Marsha De Cordova

Tony Lloyd

Kate Osborne

Dan Carden

Mike Amesbury

That this House condemns the actions of Royal Mail which, it believes is threatening up to 10,000 job cuts from the postal service; notes that Royal Mail made £758 million in profit in the year to March 2022, but paid out most of that, around £567 million, to shareholders in dividends and a share buyback; further notes that Royal Mail reported record profits and is concerned of mismanagement of finances as they are now reporting that they are losing one million pounds a day; notes that Royal Mail imposed a 2 per cent pay award during a time of spiralling inflation and a cost of living crisis; considers that postal workers provide an important service to millions of people in every corner of the country and is an essential part of the UK’s national infrastructure; notes that Royal Mail’s business plan threatens the Universal Service Obligation set out in the Postal Services Act 2011; further considers that a cut to jobs will not only harm these workers but the communities that they serve including small business owners; considers that Royal Mail is abandoning mutually agreed plans for modernisation, choosing instead to pursue what it sees as an asset stripping agenda; further believes that this threatens the future of the company and is an unacceptable attack on the terms and conditions of postal workers; and calls on Royal Mail to negotiate a fair offer with the Communications Workers Union that values their service and hard work.


535Detention of Jagtar Singh Johal

Tabled: 7/11/22 Signatories: 52

Martin Docherty-Hughes

John Spellar

Allan Dorans

Jeremy Corbyn

Jim Shannon

Hannah Bardell

Liz Saville Roberts

That this House notes that Friday 4 November 2022 marks the fifth anniversary of the arbitrary detention in India of Jagtar Singh Johal, a Sikh activist from Dumbarton held since being abducted from the street during his honeymoon by unidentified assailants who turned out to be undercover police agents; further notes that while held incommunicado for 10 days by local Police, he alleges that he was tortured both physically and through electric shocks to his nipples and genitals, something which led him to signing a confession, a confession that has subsequently been used when filing charges against him; supports the ruling of the UN Working Group on arbitrary detention which in May gave its opinion that Jagtar’s detention was an arbitrary one; urges the Government to also support this opinion, and do what it can to achieve Jagtar’s immediate release; notes with dismay the revelations in the Investigatory Powers Commissioner’s Office annual report in March 2020 that there may have been the involvement of UK intelligence services in sharing the information that led to Jagtar’s arrest; urges the Government to be open and transparent about which Ministers knew about this and when; and calls on them to suspend all work toward towards a Free Trade Agreement with the Republic of India as long as Jagtar remains arbitrarily detained.


537Liver cancer

Tabled: 7/11/22 Signatories: 22

Sir George Howarth

Jonathan Edwards

Jeremy Corbyn

Allan Dorans

Wayne David

Amy Callaghan

Martyn Day

That this House notes that liver cancer is one of the less survivable cancers with mortality rates rising by 40 per cent over the last decade; recognises that only 13 per cent of liver cancer patients survive for five years after diagnosis; further notes that the number of people dying from liver cancer is increasing the fastest out of the 20 most common forms of cancer; encourages the Government to commit to improving earlier diagnosis and outcomes for liver cancer and the less survivable cancers in the upcoming 10-Year Cancer Plan; supports the recent launch of Liver Cancer UK by the British Liver Trust; and welcomes the efforts of the Less Survivable Cancer Taskforce to close the deadly cancer gap.


548Young people's experiences of food insecurity

Tabled: 7/11/22 Signatories: 16

Hywel Williams

Jonathan Edwards

Apsana Begum

Jim Shannon

Douglas Chapman

Patrick Grady

Liz Saville Roberts

That this House notes recent research carried out by Centrepoint into food insecurity experienced by young people; further notes with deep concern the findings which show that over a fifth of young people say they have missed work or education due to lack of food; highlights with alarm that nearly half of the general youth population in the UK say they have gone to bed hungry in the last 12 months; recognises that under-25s receive a lower benefit rate which makes it difficult to meet essential living and housing costs, particularly for young people without family support; further recognises that this policy makes it difficult for young people to move on from homelessness and puts them at risk of harm, exploitation and abuse; and supports Centrepoint’s recommendation that young people living independently without family support, including care leavers, should be able to claim the adult rate of the Universal Credit standard allowance to help them meet essential costs and avoid homelessness for good.


553Freeing political prisoners ahead of elections in Bahrain

Tabled: 8/11/22 Signatories: 15

Mr Alistair Carmichael

Richard Burgon

Chris Stephens

Wendy Chamberlain

Tim Farron

Jonathan Edwards

Liz Saville Roberts

That this House notes that parliamentary elections will take place in Bahrain on 12 November 2022 amidst ongoing repression; decries that leading opposition figures including Hassan Mushaima, Abduljalil Al Singace, Abdulhadi Al Khawaja, Abdulwahab Husain and Sheikh Mohammed Habib Al Muqdad remain behind bars serving life sentences for their roles in the 2011 pro-democracy uprising in Bahrain, along with the leader of Al Wefaq, Sheikh Ali Salman, despite international calls for them to be released; raises concerns that Bahrain’s 2018 political isolation law prohibits members of dissolved political societies and sentenced individuals from running for office or voting, even if they were pardoned; further raises concerns that tens of thousands of people will not be able to stand as candidates in the election as a result of this legislation; denounces threats made by Bahrain’s Office of the Public Prosecution that anyone who calls for the elections to be boycotted will face imprisonment and a fine; contends that Bahrain’s parliament lacks the legislative power to effectively scrutinise government Ministers or officials; fears that Bahrain’s elections will lack legitimacy and make a mockery of democratic principles; calls upon Bahrain to release opposition leaders, all political prisoners and death row inmates highlighted in the recent report by the Bahrain Institute for Rights and Democracy and Human Rights Watch ahead of elections; and calls on the Government not to recognise the outcome of these elections and to urge Bahrain to release all opposition figures immediately and unconditionally and repeal its repressive political isolation law.


555Use of COP27 to make direct representations to the Egyptian Government for Alaa Abd el-Fattah’s immediate release

Tabled: 8/11/22 Signatories: 23

Olivia Blake

Dan Carden

Clive Lewis

Jim Shannon

Apsana Begum

Richard Burgon

Liz Saville Roberts

This house condemns Alaa Abd el-Fattah’s ongoing imprisonment in Egypt; expresses serious concern at his treatment by Egyptian authorities and for his health and wellbeing; notes that he has been on hunger strike for over six months and has now begun a water strike; further notes that his imprisonment is part of a wider pattern of political arrests and disappearances and that he is one of as many as 60,000 political prisoners held in Egypt; also notes that Abd el-Fattah is a British citizen and therefore entitled to consular support from the British embassy; also notes with concern that the UK Government has yet to call publicly for his unconditional release; also notes that the total value of UK arms exports licensed to Egypt in the last three years was £24m and that this would provide significant leverage in talks to secure Abd el-Fattah’s release; and urges the Government to use COP27 to make direct representations to the Egyptian Government for Abd el-Fattah’s immediate release and to provide him with independent medical assistance.


557Pressure ulcers and International Stop the Pressure Day

Tabled: 8/11/22 Signatories: 21

Margaret Greenwood

Jim Shannon

Apsana Begum

Richard Burgon

Rachael Maskell

Mick Whitley

Liz Saville Roberts

That this House acknowledges that 17 November 2022 marks International Stop the Pressure Day, an annual awareness day which aims to create a significant culture shift and eliminate avoidable pressure ulcers in all health and care settings; notes that pressure ulcers are one of the easiest to prevent, but hardest to treat, problems experienced by the spinal cord injured community; further notes the devastating consequences that pressure ulcers can have on quality of life for people who experience them and their loved ones; recognises that pressure ulcers require constant vigilance and can escalate quickly to the point where they become life-threatening; further recognises that the Spinal Injuries Association estimates that treating pressure ulcers are estimated to cost the combined National Health Services of England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland more than five million pounds every single day; welcomes International Stop the Pressure Awareness Day and the role it plays in raising awareness about pressure ulcers; believes that NHS services should routinely record incidence of pressure ulcers; and calls on the Government to invest more in research and increase funding for treatment and prevention of pressure ulcers to improve patient care and reduce the long-term financial cost to the NHS.


558Trophy hunting import and exports

Tabled: 8/11/22 Signatories: 44

Sir Mike Penning

Richard Burgon

Chris Stephens

Mr Gregory Campbell

Jeremy Corbyn

Wendy Chamberlain

Liz Saville RobertsSir Peter Bottomley

That this House notes the recent report of the APPG on Banning Trophy Hunting: Trophy Hunting and Britain: The Case for a Ban, its contributions from IUCN scientists, CITES officials and African community leaders, and its findings that trophy hunting is exacerbating the conservation crisis and that African communities are overwhelmingly opposed to the practice; notes the concerning status of the most popular African animals shot by British trophy hunters, including elephants that are classed endangered by IUCN, the hippopotamus, zebra and leopard that are classed as vulnerable, that lion populations have fallen from 200,000 in the 1970s to 10,000, and that British trophy hunters have shot threatened cheetahs, black rhinos and polar bears; notes that British trophy hunters are winning prizes from killing large numbers of animals, including an award for shooting animals from 125 different species, and British-owned firms are selling holidays to shoot endangered animals; notes that 86 per cent of submissions received by DEFRA from experts and others during the public consultation expressed support for a ban, that opinion polls show nine out of 10 voters support a ban, and that a ban enjoys support from cross-party MPs and Lords, media organisations, and conservation and animal welfare charities; and calls on the Government to fully support the passage of the Trophy Hunting (Imports Prohibition) bill, including as a tribute to the late Sir David Amess MP who campaigned tirelessly on this issue, and to allocate whatever time may be necessary for the bill to pass.


559Arrest of journalists at protests

Tabled: 9/11/22 Signatories: 23

Olivia Blake

John McDonnell

Ian Mearns

Apsana Begum

Richard Burgon

Lloyd Russell-Moyle

Liz Saville Roberts

This House notes with alarm the arrest and detention of the LBC journalist, Charlotte Lynch, on the suspicion of causing conspiracy to commit public nuisance during her coverage of a Just Stop Oil Protest, despite showing police officers a legitimate press accreditation; notes that she was detained for a total of five hours without being questioned and was searched twice in this time; reaffirms that journalists should have the right to cover protests without fear of arrest or detention from the police, and that this is a vital part of living in a free, transparent, accountable and democratic society; believes this arrest should be viewed in the context of increasing powers to restrict protest; believes this has created a culture in which protest is seen as illegitimate, and those who demonstrate or who are even loosely connected to a demonstration in whatever capacity, are regarded as suspicious; urges the Government to protect the freedom of journalists to report on events without fear of arrest or detention, and to investigate the circumstances of Lynch’s arrest to ensure similar does not happen again.


560Domestic Abuse and public life

Tabled: 9/11/22 Signatories: 24

Apsana Begum

Kate Kniveton

Caroline Lucas

Chris Stephens

Christine Jardine

Kate Osborne

Liz Saville Roberts

This House notes that domestic abuse involves a pattern of incidents of controlling, coercive, threatening, degrading and violent behaviour, including sexual violence, in the majority of cases by a partner or ex-partner; understands that not all domestic abuse takes place in the home or during a current relationship and that often women are most vulnerable when they are leaving a relationship, or after it has ended; highlights that post-separation control and/or harassment is a form of abuse that can occur long after a relationship or marriage is over, with different tactics of abuse employed; recognises that domestic abuse is prevalent and can affect people from all walks of life and in all forms of employment, including those public life; also notes that female political representatives, including those from Black, Asian, and Minority Ethnic backgrounds, face disproportionate barriers and are at greater risk of harassment and abuse; and therefore calls on all political parties to ensure that political representatives who are survivors of domestic abuse are not exposed to further harassment in their roles and to raise awareness of the issues in order to create a society where individuals experiencing domestic abuse feel confident that they will be believed, listened to and treated supportively.


561UK Disability History Month

Tabled: 9/11/22 Signatories: 18

Dr Lisa Cameron

Tim Farron

Jeremy Corbyn

Marion Fellows

Allan Dorans

Jonathan Edwards

Liz Saville Roberts

That this House recognises that 16 November to 16 December is Disability History Month which is now in its thirteenth year of being celebrated in the United Kingdom and that Disability History Month is a month to celebrate disabled people and champion their abilities and rights; notes that this year’s joint themes are Disability, Health and Well Being; commends UKDHM Organiser Richard Rieser and the many disability activists for their dedication and efforts to bringing Disability History Month to the UK; also recognises that more than half the 14.5 million people currently identified as disabled in the UK have hidden impairments; further recognises that due to discrimination many who can pass as non-disabled have chosen not to identify, even though this has caused them many difficulties; calls for the wider promotion and protection of disability rights; understands the importance of combatting the stigma surrounding disability for disabled people’s health and well-being; also recognises the need to move away from a medical approach to disability; and urges parliamentarians to work for an inclusive, accessible, and sustainable society for disabled people in the United Kingdom.


562Domestic Abuse and workplaces

Tabled: 9/11/22 Signatories: 23

Apsana Begum

Kate Kniveton

Caroline Lucas

Chris Stephens

Kate Osborne

Ian Mearns

Liz Saville Roberts

This House note that domestic abuse involves a pattern of incidents of controlling, coercive, threatening, degrading and violent behaviour, including sexual violence, in the majority of cases by a partner or ex-partner; recognises that domestic abuse can have profound long-term effects on survivors and is concerned that is very difficult to speak out about domestic abuse and often those that do are subject to further silencing tactics; further recognises that domestic violence is a workplace issue and that it can affect employment performance and in some cases even mean the abuse is carried out in the workplace; believes that domestic abuse policies form an essential part of a strategy to achieve equal opportunities in the workplace; calls on all employers to ensure workplaces are places of safety for survivors of domestic abuse with measures in place for their protection and an environment fostered where individuals experiencing domestic abuse feel confident that they will be believed, listened to and treated supportively; and calls on the Government to ensure a nationally funded network of domestic violence and abuse support services.


565British Indian Ocean Territory sovereignty negotiations

Tabled: 9/11/22 Signatories: 18

Jeremy Corbyn

Patrick Grady

Margaret Ferrier

Jon Trickett

John McDonnell

Ms Diane Abbott

Liz Saville Roberts

That this House congratulates His Majesty’s Government on its decision to begin negotiations with Mauritius concerning sovereignty of the Chagos Archipelago (British Indian Ocean Territory) to seek agreement to resolve all outstanding issues in accordance with international law including those relating to the former inhabitants; recognises that this is a significant reversal of a long standing policy; acknowledges the tireless campaigning by the Chagos Islands (BIOT) APPG and its Coordinator since 2008, the work of the Chagos Refugees Group and other Chagossian organisations, and the roles played by lawyers, the English and International courts; looks forward to the day when Chagossians who wish to return to the islands are permitted to do so.


567Cystic fibrosis and mental health provision

Tabled: 14/11/22 Signatories: 10

Dr Lisa Cameron

Jonathan Edwards

Christine Jardine

Ben Lake

Chris Law

Allan Dorans

Liz Saville Roberts

That this House recognises the vital importance of psychosocial professionals in supporting those with long term health conditions including cystic fibrosis (CF) with their mental health and wellbeing, alongside providing support in employment or education; believes that everyone with CF who requires it should have access to a CF specialist social worker and clinical psychologist as outlined in NHS CF service specifications; notes the Cystic Fibrosis Trust’s staffing report that found that more than two thirds (69%) of UK paediatric CF centres and nearly half (44%) of UK adult CF centres reported not having a CF specialist social worker; and calls on the Government to urgently address a workforce strategy to progress recruitment and retention issues facing CF centres UK wide.


570Deaths in The Gambia and contaminated medicines imported from India

Tabled: 14/11/22 Signatories: 5

Anne McLaughlin

Jim Shannon

Chris Law

Allan Dorans

Liz Saville Roberts

That this House is dismayed by the death of more than 60 children in The Gambia from acute kidney problems believed to be linked to the use of contaminated paracetamol syrups imported from India, which were subsequently subject to a medical product alert by the World Health Organisation (WHO); notes the WHO, relevant Indian authorities, and the Indian pharmaceutical company believed to be responsible are undertaking an investigation, with the manufacturing activities of the latter having been suspended; notes also that the Gambian authorities have ordered all cough and cold syrups in circulation in the country to be recovered; is deeply concerned that India’s drug regulatory laws are currently inadequate and that the country lacks a unified pharmaceutical regulator; is alarmed by reports that Gambian officials did not act quickly enough when deaths were first reported and did not test the imported drugs to ensure their quality before sanctioning their use; calls on the Indian and Gambian Governments to ensure affected families receive justice, to include the prosecution of those responsible and payment of compensation; and, asks the UK Government to support efforts by Gambian authorities to improve its quality control over imported medicines and foods.


573Anti-bullying Week 2022

Tabled: 14/11/22 Signatories: 9

Jim Shannon

Jonathan Edwards

Patricia Gibson

Ben Lake

Mr Gregory Campbell

Anne McLaughlin

Liz Saville RobertsClaire Hanna

That this House notes Anti-bullying Week 2022, which runs from 14 to 18 November; further notes this year's Reach Out campaign by the Anti-bullying Alliance that shines a light on the impacts of bullying and encourages all those young and old alike to take action against acts of bullying; underlines the horrid effects bullying has on individuals' self-confidence and the ongoing impacts it can have on young children especially; expresses concern at the 5.4 million students who miss school at least once due to bullying and the 530,000 pupils who will skip school more than three times; highlights odd socks day on Monday 14 November to raise awareness of anti-bullying; and encourages those to come forward and speak out without fear.


574Commemoration of hero John Herivel

Tabled: 14/11/22 Signatories: 3

Jim Shannon

Mr Gregory Campbell

Claire Hanna

That this House commemorates hero John Herivel, born on Malone Avenue in Belfast in 1918 and who worked as a codebreaker at Bletchley Park during the war to help decipher the Enigma Code; notes the time spent by John and his colleague Alan Turing in deciphering the code, with Herivel's tip being a vital component in handicapping the Nazi war machines in the 1940s, these being used to send encrypted military messages to Nazis throughout the war; further notes the work at Bletchley Park which was kept a secret for decades but possibly shortened the conflict by two to four years; highlights the blue plaque to honour the efforts of Herivel at Methodist College Belfast, where he was educated and encouraged to expand his ability in maths; and remembers with pride the impacts codebreaking had in World War II.


578Global hunger and the UN Sustainable Development Goals (No. 3)

Tabled: 14/11/22 Signatories: 14

Tony Lloyd

Claudia Webbe

Jonathan Edwards

Jim Shannon

Hilary Benn

Christina Rees

Ms Marie RimmerLiz Saville RobertsClaire Hanna

That this House is concerned by warnings from the World Food Programme (WFP) that 18.9 million Afghans are acutely food insecure and six million are on the brink of famine; highlights that Save the Children report a 47 per cent increase in dangerously malnourished children in Afghanistan; notes that international support was largely responsible for preventing famine in Afghanistan in winter 2021-22; emphasises that the WFP says millions of families have almost no way to endure another harsh winter; highlights that the Afghan economy has almost collapsed since the Taliban takeover and the suspension of most international aid, meaning Afghans have limited access to basic services and some are having to take desperate measures such as marrying off or even selling their children; notes that external factors, such as the war in Ukraine, have contributed to rising food prices; highlights that this economic crisis has been exacerbated by droughts, floods, and earthquakes; further notes that floods in Pakistan have worsened the situation by damaging trade; emphasises the role of climate change in these disasters; is dismayed that the world is set to fail the UN Sustainable Development Goal of Zero Hunger by 2030; believes that the UK has a continuing responsibility to the Afghan people following our withdrawal from the country; and calls on the UK Government to support international and non-governmental humanitarian organisations operating in Afghanistan, promote greater international engagement to help the Afghan people, and restore the commitment to spending 0.7 per cent of GNI on international aid.


580Mixed-age couples and Universal Credit

Tabled: 14/11/22 Signatories: 11

Angela Crawley

Jonathan Edwards

Patricia Gibson

Jim Shannon

Ben Lake

Chris Law

Liz Saville RobertsClaire Hanna

That this House expresses its concerns about the eligibility rules for pension credit and housing benefit for mixed-age couples on low incomes; notes that a mixed-age couple is made up of a pensioner and their partner below the state retirement age; understands that since 2019 pensioners in mixed-age couples have been unable to make a new claim for pension credit or housing benefit and are instead forced to make a claim for Universal Credit; recognises that Universal Credit is designed as a working-age benefit and represents, in the words of Age UK, a “substantial wealth cut” for this group which was previously able to claim for pension credit and housing benefit; regrets the increase in pension-age poverty during the cost of living crisis and the expected exacerbation of problems for pensioners during this winter when many will be forced to choose between heating and eating; acknowledges that the Government has estimated that in 2022/23 there will be 50,000 mixed-age couples unable to access pension credit or housing benefits, assistance which would go some way towards alleviating pensioner poverty; and urges the Government to reverse the changes made in 2019 to allow mixed-age couples access to means-tested benefits that suit their needs.


581Protests in Iran

Tabled: 14/11/22 Signatories: 11

Nadia Whittome

Claudia Webbe

Jim Shannon

Christine Jardine

Caroline Lucas

Ben Lake

Liz Saville RobertsClaire Hanna

That this House notes that protests against the Iranian government have been taking place for the last two months in Iran following the death in custody of Mahsa Amini; further notes with alarm that the Iranian authorities have killed more than 300 people and detained thousands of others in response; understands that hundreds of people have been charged for their participation in the protests, with at least one person being sentenced to death so far; reaffirms its solidarity with pro-democracy and human rights activists, and its opposition to violent repression and the use of death sentences; urges the Government to call for the UN Human Rights Council to establish an international investigative and accountability mechanism to collect, consolidate, preserve, and analyse evidence of the most serious crimes under international law committed in Iran; and calls on the Government to commit to exercising universal jurisdiction to criminally investigate and prosecute Iranian officials suspected of criminal responsibility for crimes under international law and to strengthen Magnitsky-style sanctions on officials involved in human rights abuses.


584International Children's Games, South Lanarkshire

Tabled: 15/11/22 Signatories: 4

Dr Lisa Cameron

Jim Shannon

Marion Fellows

Allan Dorans

That this House celebrates the incredible performance of Team South Lanarkshire at the International Children’s 2022 Games in Coventry; notes that the squad won gold in two events and also a silver medal, achieving many more personal bests for the individual athletes participating; also notes that in each sport they competed in they reached the finals; further acknowledges the success of the girls’ football team in winning a gold medal and not conceding a single goal throughout the tournament, the gold and silver medal won in the boys’ 1500m and girls ‘100m respectively; congratulates the swimming team reaching the final of the tournament; and salutes the efforts made by coaching staff and parents in encouraging the role of exercise in promoting children's health and wellbeing.


585EK Credit Unions 40th Anniversary

Tabled: 15/11/22 Signatories: 3

Dr Lisa Cameron

Jim Shannon

Allan Dorans

This house congratulates East Kilbride Credit Union on their 40th Anniversary; thanks Mr John Geraghty and Mr Les Walker who instigated the credit union and who still sit on the board of directors today as President and Chairman; commends EK Credit Union’s success in increasing accessible savings and credit facilities for people across East Kilbride; notes their expansion with a recent digital drive improving inclusion and accessibility; further notes EK Credit Union’s dedication and ethos to serving the public including those most vulnerable, setting an example to other financial service providers; and wishes EK Credit Union every success for the future.


587Passing of Jimmy O'Rourke

Tabled: 15/11/22 Signatories: 10

Ian Blackford

Mr Gregory Campbell

Jim Shannon

Jonathan Edwards

Anne McLaughlin

Patricia Gibson

Stephen FlynnAllan Dorans

This House notes with sadness the passing of Jimmy O’Rourke at the age of 76 at his home in Edinburgh; recalls that Jimmy became the youngest ever player to play for Hibernian aged 16 years and 85 days in 1962, a record that stood until 2004; further recalls that he remains the youngest ever Hibernian goal scorer having hit the net against Dunfermline three days after his debut; also notes that Jimmy scored 122 goals for Hibernian, perhaps most notably a hattrick against Sporting Lisbon in the Cup Winners Cup in 1972, the same season that he netted a brace in Hibs' famous 0-7 New Year's Day victory against Hearts; remembers that the song goes Jimmy, Jimmy O’Rourke, everyone knows his name; and expresses the hope that Jimmy will rest in peace.


588Social tariff for domestic energy use

Tabled: 15/11/22 Signatories: 5

Emma Hardy

Jim Shannon

Jonathan Edwards

Claudia Webbe

Claire Hanna

That this House believes in protections for low income, vulnerable and fuel poor households; notes that even with the current price cap in place there has been a 139 per cent increase in a year on the average bill; recognises that as a result there are now 6.7 million households in fuel poverty and many more grappling with soaring energy prices; further notes with alarm the possibility that a further 3 million households could slip into fuel poverty in April 2023, bringing the total number to the highest levels since records began; notes with concern that there has been a significant increase in the number of households being involuntarily moved onto prepayment meters and that Citizens Advice report a truly unprecedented number of people who can’t afford to top up their prepayment energy meter; calls on the Government to introduce a social tariff into the energy market of the kind advocated by Fair By Design and National Energy Action, but which at a minimum must: be priced below the default tariff price cap, capped against significant increases, targeted at those most in need and reduce the energy costs of vulnerable consumers; and further calls for such a tariff to be additional to the Warm Home Discount and Default Tariff Price Cap, mandated across all suppliers to guarantee equality of access, and that all eligible consumers must be automatically enrolled onto the tariff using suppliers’ existing customer data and/or via data-sharing with the Department of Work and Pensions and HMRC.


591Imprisonment for Public Protection sentences: Justice Committee report

Tabled: 15/11/22 Signatories: 22

Kim Johnson

Ms Diane Abbott

Ms Marie Rimmer

Nadia Whittome

Liz Saville Roberts

Grahame Morris

Maria Eagle

That this House welcomes the Justice Committee's report on Imprisonment for Public Protection (IPP) sentences, which were introduced under the Criminal Justice Act 2003 to detain people in prison who posed a significant risk of causing harm to the public; notes that IPP sentences were abolished prospectively, but not retrospectively, by the Legal Aid, Sentencing and Punishment of Offenders Act 2012; further notes that there were 2,926 IPP prisoners in England and Wales as of 30 June 2022, of which 1,492 had never been released and 1,434 had been recalled to custody, which is expected to rise sharply over the next few years; agrees with the Committee's recommendations calling for significant reform of the operation of IPP sentences, and especially its key recommendation that the Government legislate to enable a resentencing exercise for all IPP-sentenced individuals, except for those who have successfully had their licence terminated; believes that, a decade after the prospective abolition of the IPP sentence, it is time for the Government to take steps to bring certainty and hope to those prisoners still serving a sentence that has since been discredited; calls on the Government to respond to the Committee in a timely fashion and to accept its recommendations in full; and further calls on the Government to make Parliamentary time available, at the earliest opportunity, for the legislation necessary to enable a resentencing exercise.